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Korean Conflict

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Unit Two
Korean Conflict
HIST105
January 20, 2013

Abstract
In this essay you will learn about the Korean War conflict and how it ended and what went wrong. Also how the United States deals with the conflict of the Korean War.

How did this war affect American sensibilities, including the way Americans viewed the war and themselves? There were many different consequences occurred as a result of the Korean Conflict, which ended in 1953, with thousands of fatalities but no clear victor and no peace treaty signed. The north continued to be occupied by communist forces, and the South becomes an American ally. Also, Korea illustrated how a relatively contained conflict could turn into a much broader regional conflagration. As the conflict escalated, there were points in time in which China and the Soviet Union could have conceivably been drawn into the conflict, potentially resulting in another regional, or even general war. Perhaps most importantly, Korea illustrated how tension between the U.S.S.R. and the United States could become full-scale conflicts. Other long-term consequences include the establishment of permanent nuclear installations in South Korea and the commitment of conventional U.S. military equipment and troops to South Korea for decades afterwards. Did the war change America’s world and why? Other important legislative changes include the passage of the War Power Act (1973), requiring U.S. presidents to receive explicit approval from Congress before forces could be deployed overseas for combat purposes. Politically, the conflict resulted in an aversion to further American casualties, which fundamentally changed U.S. intervention in later international conflicts. The Democratic party also experienced serious consequences in 1968. Democratic voters, split over U.S. involvement in Vietnam, divided their votes between Hubert Humphrey and George Wallace, resulting in a Republican presidential victory a Democratic party whose politics...