Kite Runner; Past Regrets

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The Kite Runner is a book that was written by Khaled Hosseini from a young boy’s perspective named Amir who lived with his father, Baba, and two Hazaras named Ali and Hassan in Kabul, Afghanistan. They lived here during the Russian War and had escaped to America to find peace and happiness. We learn about Amir’s childhood struggles and his efforts to be what his father wanted him to be and to be a good friend like Hassan is to him. Amir knows that Hassan is better than what he deserves; he knows he is guilty through his secrets and his selfishness. Materialistically, Amir and his father had a good life and treated Ali and Hassan quite well, but we discover that there is a reason for the good treatment that they receive from mainly Baba. Amir witnesses a very tragic experience that Hassan is put through with Assef and he does not take a stand. Amir is cowardice unlike Hassan. Although it may seem that Amir is confused with what he should do about what he has done and the secrets that he hides, his final decision will affect the rest of his life. He runs from his past escaping to America in hopes that his guilt will finally be freed. Amir and Hassan are best friends, technically brothers. They have grown up together and spend every day with each other running around playing games and telling as many stories as their hearts desire. They both had the same enemy though. Their enemy was Assef. He was a kid right around their age. Assef always made fun of Hassan for being a Hazara and how he is of a low class. Hassan was such an innocent kid, though he never took a stand against Assef and neither did Amir. The moment that Amir was threatened by Assef, Hassan stood up against him and threatened him with his sling-shot. Amir then realizes that Hassan truly cares and that he has been selfish when it comes to Hassan. Hassan is everything that Amir is not and he would do anything to please Amir. “You should know something about me, Hazara, I’m a very patient person. This doesn’t end today, believe me” (Hosseini 42). His revenge can cause a terrible remembrance and a dishonest lie. It was not too long after that Assef had found his revenge against Hassan. One of the most prestigious events in Afghanistan is the annual kite-fighting contest. This was a favorite pastime of Hassan and Amir. Amir would fly the kite and Hassan would chase the kites that he cut in the event and give them to Amir as trophies. There was one specific event that Amir favored the most; this was the event that took place in his neighborhood right in front of his house. “I kept stealing glances at Baba sitting with Rahim Khan on the roof, wondered what he was thinking. Was he cheering for me? Or did a part of him enjoy watching me fail? That was the thing about kite flying: Your mind drifted with the kite” (Hosseini 63). Amir’s biggest worry was impressing Baba. According to Amir, Baba was all about winning. Winning was Baba’s thing and Amir felt that if he could win this kite-flying competition, maybe Baba would be finally proud of him and give Amir the attention that he craves. In the last part of the competition, Amir says: All I saw was the blue kite. All I smelled was victory. Salvation. Redemption. If Baba was wrong and there was a God like they said in school, then He’d let me win… But this was my one chance to become someone who was looked at, not seen, listened to, not heard (Hosseini 65).

He sends Hassan after the blue kite in hopes that this last kite of his victory would be given to his father and this would be the one thing for which Baba would be proud of him. This kite resembles Amir’s redemption with his father. When Hassan was chasing down the kite, he was caught in an alley by Assef. Amir had not seen Hassan come back for a while so Amir went looking for him. He found Hassan in the alley, but he didn’t let Hassan know he was there; he stayed hidden. “I’ve changed my mind, I’m letting you keep the kite Hazara. I’ll let you keep it so it will...
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