Ketchup and Sweet-and-tangy Food Sauce

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Ketchup, Sauce, Tomato sauce
  • Pages : 2 (302 words )
  • Download(s) : 504
  • Published : March 14, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
Ketchup (also catsup, tomato sauce, or red sauce) is a sweet-and-tangy food sauce, typically made from tomatoes, vinegar, a sweetener, and assorted seasonings and spices. The sweetener is most commonly sugar or high-fructose corn syrup. Seasonings vary by recipe, but commonly include onions, allspice, cloves, cinnamon, garlic, and celery.[1] Ketchup is often used as a condiment with french fries (chips), hamburgers, sandwiches, and grilled or fried meat. In Australia and New Zealand, it is a typical accompaniment for meat pies. Ketchup is sometimes used as a basis or ingredient for other sauces and dressings. Contents [hide]

1 History
1.1 Later innovations
2 Terminology
2.1 China theory
2.1.1 Fish sauce
2.1.2 Tomato sauce
2.2 Malay theory
2.3 European-Arabic theory
2.4 Early uses in English
2.5 "Fancy" ketchup
3 Nutrition
4 Viscosity
5 Politics
6 See also
7 References
8 External links
[edit]History

A bottle of Geo. Watkins mushroom ketchup
In the 1690s the Chinese mixed together a concoction of pickled fish and spices and called it kôe-chiap or kê-chiap (鮭汁) meaning the brine of pickled fish (鮭, carp; 汁, juice) or shellfish.[2] By the early 18th century, the table sauce had made it to the Malay states (present day Malaysia and Singapore), where it was discovered by British explorers, and by 1740, it had become a British staple.[citation needed] The Malay word for the sauce was kĕchap. That word evolved into the English word "ketchup".[3] Many variations of ketchup were created, but the tomato-based version did not appear until about a century after other types. By 1801, a recipe for tomato ketchup was created by Sandy Addison and was later printed in an American cookbook, the Sugar House Book.[4]
tracking img