Kafka

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A Whole Is Greater Than The Sum Of It’s Parts
The opinions and expressions within society are quick to change when given specific circumstances. Often, individuals are likely to go with social trends and ideas to fit in, rather than standing out on their own. Even if that trend forgoes their personal values and beliefs, most would rather follow through than risk becoming an outcast. The following pieces of work: “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson, “The Metamorphosis” by Franz Kafka and “The Rise and Fall of Sharpie Cakes” by Haruki Murakami demonstrate abstract themes such as society’s influence on the individual, enabling concrete images and sensory details via irony, symbolism and tone to enhance the reading experience.

These stories heavily utilize sensory details and irony, creating an underlying tension, which further develops the reading experience by playing on emotions and providing a sense of anxiety. “The Lottery” by Jackson illustrates a world where a close-knit village of townspeople is gathered to participate in a lottery. Where one would believe the winner receives a treasured commodity, the reward is in fact, death. The town is described as “clear and sunny, with the fresh warmth of a full summer-day” (Jackson 1). By setting the story in pleasant conditions, one would infer that some good would come from the day’s event. However, a sense of uneasiness lingers in the “friendly” dialogue between the villagers, nullifying the

optimism of the weather. “The children assembled first…and the feeling of liberty sat uneasily…the men began to gather… and their jokes were quiet and they smiled rather than laughed” (Jackson 1). By describing the bright atmosphere presented by the weather and the townspeople, Jackson deepens the meaning of the gathering by giving the false impression of hope and euphoria. Although, by displaying the subtlety in the peoples’ actions, Jackson also implements tension within the crowd of villagers...
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