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Judith Wright Essay "Wedding Photograph" and "The Old Prison"

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Judith Wright Essay "Wedding Photograph" and "The Old Prison"

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  • July 24, 2007
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Poetry, in its many different forms may been seen as a gateway into the deeper layers of a persons inner being that allows their thoughts and opinions to be recognized through their writing. This insight allows readers to gain a wider perspective on the views the poet bears on the many themes and issues raised throughout their poetry. In the poems, Wedding Photograph, 1913 and The Old Prison, poet Judith Wright uses strong imagery to comment on the themes and issues present in society, from the devastation of war which is relayed through the use of personification and alliteration, to the impracticality of altering the past showed by the inclusion of symbolism and simile. This in turn conveys to us the mistakes that we have made as a species and how these faults of humanity have lead to severe repercussions over time. Through the rich imagery provided by Wright, we are influenced to form an opinion on the issues raised in her poetry and thereby induce change to the society we currently reside within, and learn from the blunders made by those in the past.

Imagery is displayed throughout many forms of poetry to deliver clear messages to readers that will ultimately influence their reading. It is through such imagery that a poets view on particular issues present within society is brought to light. In Wedding Photograph, 1913, Judith Wrights views on society in her time was made evident through the insertion of alliteration that contributed to conveying the concept of war, and the devastation it can inflict upon those directly and indirectly involved with it.

But through the smell of a tweed shoulder sobbed-on,Through picnics, scoldings, moralities impartedShyly, the sound of songs at a piano Wright uses alliteration here to emphasize the emotions that are felt by the persona at this stage in the poem. The shoulder sobbed-on really insinuates the despair felt by the persona, and suggests that it is derived from the repercussions of the war time. It is evident...