JP Morgan Chase Merger Case Study

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Abstract
Mergers and acquisitions have become the most frequently used methods of growth for companies in the twenty first century. They present a company with a potentially larger market share and open it up to a more diversified market. A merger is considered to be successful, if it increases the acquiring firm’s value; most mergers have actually been known to benefit both competition and consumers by allowing firms operate more efficiently. However, it has to be noted that some mergers and acquisitions have the capacity to decrease competition in various ways. The merger between JP Morgan Chase and Bank One presented JP Morgan Chase with the opportunity to expand its perspective through providing the firm with access to retail banking markets and clientele in the regions where its previous exposure had been virtually inexistent. The merger gave the firm that extra growth and competitive edge that it was looking for to compete with Citigroup and other rivals. Research has shown, that due to increasing advances in technology and banking processes, which make transactions, among other aspects of business, more effective and efficient, mergers and acquisitions have become more frequent today then ever before. The topic of mergers and acquisitions is extremely complicated, with the numerous types of mergers that are out there today. It is also remarkably interesting, with the controversies and fierce price wars, which surround most mergers and acquisitions. In the world of growing economy and globalization, major companies on both domestic and international markets struggle to achieve the optimum market share possible. Every day business people from top to lower management work to achieve a common goal – being the best at what you do, and getting there as fast as possible. As companies work hard to beat their competitors they assume various tactics to do so. Some of their tactics may include competing in the market of their core competence, thus, insuring that they have the optimal knowledge and experience to have a fighting chance against their rivals in the same business; hostile takeovers; or the most popular way to achieve growth and dominance – mergers and acquisitions. Mergers and acquisitions are the most frequently used methods of growth for companies in the twenty first century. Mergers and acquisitions present a company with a potentially larger market share and open it up to a more diversified market. At times, a merger or an acquisition simply makes a company larger, expands its staff and production, and gives it more financial and other resources to be a stronger competitor on the market. To define this topic more clearly, let me state that a corporate merger, as defined by the “Quick MBA” reference website, is the combination of the assets and liabilities of two firms to form a single business entity. In everyday language, the term "acquisition" tends to be used when a larger firm absorbs a smaller firm, and "merger" tends to be used when the combination is portrayed to be between equals. In case of a merger between two firms that are approximately equal, there often is an exchange of stock in which one firm issues new shares to the shareholders of the other firm at a certain ratio. It has been customary that the firm whose shares continue to exist, even if that occurs under an alternate company name, is referred to as the acquiring firm and the firm whose shares are being replaced by the acquiring firm is usually called the target firm. You can refer to the appendix of this thesis to find the formula for the premerger stock price. A merger is considered to be successful, if it increases the acquiring firm’s value. Clearly, judging from the various statistics charts found in the appendix, there is a considerable amount of companies in the United States which believe that a merger will increase their company’s value. An article which was recently published by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) noted that the...
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