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Japan's Nuclear Power Crisis

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Japan's Nuclear Power Crisis

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  • December 2012
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The Nuclear Power Crisis In Japan
Rabeea Bakrea
Introduction:-
Japan right now is facing a great energy problem, since the Tsunami on March 11th, 2011 the country shut down most of the Nuclear Power Plants for maintenance purposes but until now, they did not come back to normal, talking in numbers 43 out of 52 Nuclear Power Plants were shut down (The Economist, 2011). Japan is one of the largest nuclear power countries in the world, with 52 plants in operation, three under construction and 11 planned for the future. Approximately 25% of electricity in Japan is generated by nuclear power. Japan is currently the world’s third largest nuclear power, following the U.S. and France. Atomic Industrial Forum (JAIF) in Japan is what represents the Nuclear Power Industry, it was established in 1956 to promote peaceful use of Nuclear Power (JST News, 2008). The Japanese government is rethinking about their energy policy and finding new energy supply after the disaster of Tsunami 2011 (BJT News, 2012). Causes Of The Nuclear Power Crisis:-

The roots of the Nuclear Power crisis refer to the day of March 11th, 2011 when the Tsunami waves attacked the Japanese island and one of many targets was the Fukushima Nuclear Plant which is the number 1 station (The Guardian, 2011). Ken Koyama, Chief Economist at Japan’s Institute of Energy Economics said that the accident in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear power plant have made Japanese to rethink on its reliance on nuclear power and increasing demands for oil (BJT News, 2012). Consequences And Alternative Solutions:-

“The bottom line is that without nuclear power Japan will have a very hard time meeting demand," said Paul Scalise, a fellow at the University of Tokyo who specializes in Japan's energy sector.” Real change has been slow. Giant solar arrays and wind farms can't be built overnight and powerful utilities that spent billions on nuclear are lobbying to protect their interests. Oil, coal and gas now generate about nearly 90% of...