James Longstreet

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 34
  • Published : April 28, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
US HISTORY RESEARCH PAPER

JAMES LONGSTREET

The Civil War was a time of great conflict in America. James Longstreet was one of the most successful generals for the Confederate Army. Longstreet had a long respected military career where he performed many different tasks and jobs. Most of his leadership abilities were drilled into him during his time at West Point. After the war he became a target by some of his comrade for many reasons. They no longer believed in the confederacy like Longstreet did being such a committed member. Longstreet went through a lot from his early life, to his education, and then to his participation within the Civil War. All of these things helped make him the great man that he was. General Longstreet demonstrated good composure and leadership during times of war. James Longstreet was born in Edgefield District in South Carolina, January 8, 1821. Longstreet, the fifth child of James and Mary Ann Dent Longstreet was born on his grandparent's plantations. Longstreet lived his early years in Augusta, Georgia. He had moved to the state of Georgia within the first few weeks of his birth, and he then spent the next nine years of his life there. He was known to regard Georgia as his hometown and where he belonged. His father died from a cholera epidemic while visiting Augusta in 1833; after the tragic death of his father, he moved to Somerville, Alabama with his mother. Both of his parents were owners of cotton plantation near current day Gainesville, Georgia. Under the great guidance of his older sister and brother, William and Anna, James rode horseback, hunted, fished and developed a strong physique that would help him throughout his life. Many of these qualities would help his overwhelming success within sports at West Point and then on the battle field when attempting to gather food. He also gained a gradual understanding of self-confidence, self-reliance, and work ethic. (The confederacy p. 330) In a time where the military was...
tracking img