It Sifts

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Beautiful Experiences of Nature
Nature is indestructible, although it can give you experiences you will keep in mind forever. The poem, “It Sifts from Leaden Sieves” by Emily Dickenson tells us about nature and its experiences that beautify the life and death of humans. Nature here means seasonal weather such as winter and summer. The word “it” is symbolic, representing the speaker in this poem. This poem talks about the nature of snow and its effects on the environment: “To Stump, and Stack – and Stem – A Summer’s empty Room” (13, 14) However, this poem lurks deeper and also talks about woman’s beauty: “It powders all the wood.” (2) The author expresses a cold and gloomy tone and the mood derived from the poem is rather dark, empty and mysterious. The theme of this poem is that nature provides experiences that can beautify or discriminate the life of humans. Dickenson uses many literary devices that enhance the reader such as: Rhythm, Metaphors, Personification, Metonymy, and Rhyme which are used to emphasize nature’s beauty. The rhythm in this poem creates shifts which attract the reader’s attention to what’s happening. There is a rhythmic pattern in stanzas one and two: 7,6,8,6. This is not a coincidence because the author is trying to express change in the poem. These two stanzas are separated from the rest. Stanzas one and two prove that they are talking about one main thing: beauty of the woman as well as the snow falling on the road and mountains. The illusion in line three suggests the color and size of the snow droplets. In the first two stanzas she is doing one thing: looking at her reflection in the mirror while putting make up on: “It fills with Alabaster Wool,” (3) “The Wrinkles of the Road.” (4) Towards the end of the poem it switches to her dressing herself up in garments, “It wraps it Rail by Rail.” (10) The rest of the stanzas have different rhythmic patterns. This suggests that “it” is talking about something else. The metaphors in this poem...
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