Ipv6

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1.Introduction …………………………………………………………..6 1.1 What is IP? ……………………………………………………………………...6 1.2Introduction to Ipv6………………………………………………………….....6 1.3 What will IPv6 do? ……………………………………………………….........8 2.History…………………………………………………………………..9 2.1 Background…………………………………………………………………......9 2.2 Brief recap…………………………………………………..………………….10 3.IPv6 features……………………………………………………….....11 4.Why Ipv6 is needed………………………………………………….13 5.Goals……………………………………………………………………15 5.1 capabilities of Ipv6……………………………………………………………...15 5.2 Additional Requirement………………………………………………………..17 6.IPv6 header…………………………………………………………...19 7.IPv6 adderessing…………………………………………………….21 7.1 Adderess space…..……………………………………..….……………………21 7.2 Adderess syntax……………………………………..…………………………..21 7.3 compressing zero……………………………………………………………..…22 7.4 Ipv6 prefixes…………..…………………………………………………………23 8.IPv6 vs IPv4……….………………………………………………….24 9.Potential Benefits & uses of IPv6……………………….………..28 9.1Incressed Address space……………………………….……………………….28 9.2 Security improvement……….…………………………………………………30 9.3 End user applications…….……….……………………………………………30 9.4 Network evolution……….……………………………………………………...31 9.5 Other Benefits & uses…….……………………………………………….…....31 10. Migration…….………………………………………………….......33 Conclusion…..………………………………..………………………….36 References……..………………………………………………………...37

1.INTRODUCTION

1.1What is IP?
The Internet Protocol (IP) is a protocol used for communicating data across a packet-switched internetwork using the Internet Protocol Suite, also referred to as TCP/IP. IP is the primary protocol in the Internet Layer of the Internet Protocol Suite and has the task of delivering distinguished protocol datagrams (packets) from the source host to the destination host solely based on their addresses. For this purpose the Internet Protocol defines addressing methods and structures for datagram encapsulation. The first major version of addressing structure, now referred to as Internet Protocol Version 4 (Ipv4) is still the dominant protocol of the Internet, although the successor, Internet Protocol Version 6 (Ipv6) is being deployed actively worldwide. 1.2 Introduction to IPv6

The current version of the Internet Protocol (known as IP version 4 or IPv4) has not been substantially changed since RFC 791 was published in 1981. IPv4 has proven to be robust, easily implemented and interoperable, and has stood the test of scaling an internetwork to a global utility the size of today's Internet. This is a tribute to its initial design. IPv6 stands for Internet Protocol version 6. This technology is designed to replace the existing IPv4 with improved address space, service, and data. Internet Protocol version 6 is meant to allow anyone who wants to use the Internet the capability to do s However, the initial design did not anticipate:

The recent exponential growth of the Internet and the impending exhaustion of the IPv4 address space. IPv4 addresses have become relatively scarce, forcing some organizations to use a network address translator (NAT) to map multiple private addresses to a single public IP address. While NATs promote reuse of the private address space, they do not support standards-based network layer security or the correct mapping of all higher layer protocols and can create problems when connecting two organizations that use the private address space. Additionally, the rising prominence of Internet-connected devices and appliances assures that the public IPv4 address space will eventually be depleted. •The growth of the Internet and the ability of Internet backbone routers to maintain large routing tables. Because of the way in which IPv4 network IDs have been and are currently allocated, there are routinely over 70,000 routes in the routing tables of...
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