Inside Apple

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Inside Apple

Introduction

The Inside Apple book talks about many internal aspects of the company. The major theme that this book touches is the company’s internal secrets. It mentions how Steve Jobs, according to Michael Maccoby in his 2000 Harvard Business Review, was a productive narcissist as a leader, which he mentions to be visionary risk takers with a burning desire to change the world. Inside the Apple building, Steve Jobs limited every single employee to just many information. And they were not allowed to comment to any other colleague the work or assignment that they were having. The company had many off limit areas for the employees, and at times, Jobs would request that the door codes and key changed because there was a new project coming and only few people were meant to know. The book mentions that only the people who were not part of Apple wanted to work in there, and the people who worked inside Apple, wanted out, and this was because they mentioned that working at Apple is totally different than working at any other company. Steve Jobs focused obsessively over the small details, and he was not afraid of saying “no” to requested ideas. But he did not focus on making money; he focused on the product’s quality. “Apple obsesses over the user experience, not revenue optimization”-Rob Shoeben Jobs had an exclusive “Top 100” list of employees, who he gathered with him to discuss projects and other details of the company. These people were not necessarily the top managers; in fact, some of them were not even in the list. Jobs considered the people who were just right, loyal, and respectful in his seldom changing list. Tim Cook, the current CEO of Apple was considered Jobs’ sidekick, although Cooks was a calmer person than Jobs. Steve had other “disciples”, like Ive, Scott James, Jeff Williams, Bob Mensfield, Eddie Que, and others who worked loyally for him, even after his death. Steve requested these people to just do what they think it’s best for Apple The book also mentions how they evolved with many of its features, how they created Apple University, which for a time wanted to keep the academics matter out and instead place examples of enterprises. It mentions how Steve Jobs was not a multitask person, and thus, Apple did not multitask either. How Jobs was not so much of a philanthropic person and how two weeks after Cook became CEO, announced to Apple that the company would match gifts to charity up to $10,000 dollars annually. It explains how the Apple industry and products have arranged itself trough time and until 2011, the revenues from Apple were 44% for iPhones, 19% for iPads, 7% for iPods, and 20% for the Macintosh computers or laptops. Inside Apple3

Best Chapter

As I read the book, I thought that the best chapter was chapter 3, called Focus obsessively. The chapter opened with mentioning some box prototypes that were meant for only opening them. The book mentions that something as simple as the box that contents the product should be an experience for the customer, and that not all of the companies see it that way. They tried to make the box look the best for the product that it would contain, because they mentioned that the consumers might want to keep the box if they liked it. And in fact, this was a job well done, because I for one do not like to keep boxes or containers, but since I bought my iPod classic almost 5 years ago, I still keep the box in my closet, unlike any other cell phones or gadgets that I have purchased. The book mentioned that Jobs was a Buddhist, and that he used his Buddhist level of focus to a narrow assortment of offerings at Apple apart from its competitors. He studied this faith intensely, and this religion teaches, according to this book that if you are going to prepare a cup of tea, the making of that cup of tea should command all your attention. And comparing this principle with the focused attention that Steve Jobs had with his inventions, we can say...
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