Inherit the Wind

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In the play "Inherit the Wind" by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee, the defense faces numerous societal injustices, which is why they never had a chance to win the case. One example of the town's bias is presented through the town's love for Matthew Harrison Brady. A second example is the extreme conformist and pious attitude of the town's people. The last instance is the narrow-mindedness of the judge and the jury, which resulted in an unfair trial. In conclusion, the defense suffered through many unfair circumstances throughout the drama "Inherit the Wind."

The first instance of the town's prejudice is the overall affection for Brady, the prosecuting attorney. This is demonstrated when Brady first comes to the town and is greeted by a barrage of food and the citizens of Hillsboro singing "Gimme That Old-Time Religion," the lyrics of which quickly change to "It is good enough for Brady, and it's good enough for me!" The second example of adoration for Matt is when, upon being in the town no more then ten minutes, the mayor pronounces, "The Governor of our state has vested in me the authority to confer upon you a commission as Honorary Colonel in the State Militia," this announcement is applauded by the towns people. The last example is in the last scene of the play when Brady falls when giving a speech and a woman in the courtroom screams, "O Lord, work us a miracle and save our Holy Prophet!" which shows the citizen's devotion towards Brady. Over all, the defense never had a chance in winning the case due to the town's loyalty toward Brady.

The religious views of town on a whole are second example why Cates, the defendant, would without doubt be found guilty. The first instance of the religious zealots in Hillsboro was when news came that Henry Drummond, the agnostic, was to be the defense attorney; this news brought reactions such as "Henry Drummond is an agent of darkness. We won't let him in the town!" from Reverend Brown, and Drummond...
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