Importance of Wearing Seatbelts

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Introduction:
This Essay is after watching the video and reading 4 articles plus chapter3 we need to define momentum and inertia and explains the importance of wearing seat belts while riding in an automobile. The video was about what happens to a person when he/she is in a situation in a car accident, what will happen to the passenger and the other people in the back seat? What will happen to the car after the crash? Will the people survive or die? There are many questions to answer in this essay. Body of Essay:

The force on an object is equal to mass divided by velocity. In the video we saw how the car gets into a wall without paying attention, many people passed away because of texting while driving or not paying attention while trying to answer a call. Other people die because they’re not wearing seatbelts and they die. In 2009 there were 33,808 people died in traffic crashes in the United States, including an estimated 10,839 people who died in alcohol-impaired driving crashes. Newton’s first law of motion stated that every object in a state of uniform motion tends to remain in that state of motion unless an external force is applied to it. This concept is known as inertia. If a car is in motion and hits a brick wall, the passenger will remain in motion until stopped by an external force, like the brick wall. If the passenger is wearing a seatbelt, the seatbelt will be the external force that keeps the passenger from remaining in motion. Another thing is Things take time to slow down. When a cannonball lands, it takes time to decelerate, transferring its energy to its target. Its velocity does not instantaneously go to zero; otherwise, it wouldn't cause so much damage. Newton’s Second law of motion stated that the relationship between an object's mass m, its acceleration a, and the applied force F is F = ma. Acceleration and force are vectors; in this law the direction of the “force vector” is the same as the direction of the “acceleration vector.”. an...
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