Identify Strategies for Working with Foster, Migrant, Abandoned, and Homeless Children.

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Kathleen Clark
EEC 4402
Dr Oneil
October 20, 2012

Portfolio 4 Identify strategies for working with foster, migrant, abandoned, and homeless children.

When working with foster children, migrant children, abandoned and homeless children there are many strategies that need to be applied to each individual child case by case. These children may have different areas that need to be addressed depending on their individual situations. Each of these groups of children may face different challenges and some of the same challenges. Higher rates in these groups of children may fall behind in academics because some do not even speak English. Abandoned and homeless children are disadvantaged because they are of low social economic standings financially they are living in poverty and may not have adequate means or an environment that allows them to feel safe comfortable or even a place to sleep at night which will affect their performance and ability to even attend school. There are civil laws and laws within the NCLB Act known as the McKinney Vento Homeless Education Act that do not allow for schools to discriminate against homeless children, or segregate them they are entitled to be in the mainstream school environment. These are some of the differences that separate the typical students from the non typical students. Regardless of diversities these groups of children can be taught and provided the means of education so that they can reach their potentials. It is clear that all of these groups of children usually do not have any or minimal family support. Foster children who change schools more often are noted to have more difficulties because of the stress and depression of moving along with any other emotional trauma or abuse they have experienced. Resources within the school and community can help these children. Migrant workers whose children do attend schools may have language barriers...
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