Hunters in the Snow vs. the Most Dangerous Game

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Comparative Essay
Though one could argue that Wolff’s “Hunter’s in the Snow” and Connell’s “The Most Dangerous Game” share an aspect of higher insight that can be classified in literary fiction, Hunter’s in the Snow allows the reader to develop a deeper understanding of human nature by presenting three dynamic characters.

The three characters distinguish “Hunter’s in the Snow” as literary fiction through the author’s attempt on to make a statement about the human condition. “Hunters in the Snow” does not aim at simple entertainment, but rather tries to get us to see deeper into the three men's personal characters. Many devices used in literary fiction are present in "Hunters". The story does not end in a way that is either "good" or "bad"; it ends in a gray tone, almost doubling back where the story began. Weather is used throughout the work to emphasize the hostility between individuals who are foreign to any concept of altruism (rather than being a particularly nasty winter day). Contrast between the seriousness of Kenny's injury and Tub & Frank's devolving concern also helps show that there is more at work here than a hunting accident. That these people are so self-centered provides an insight into the human condition by comparison. Furthermore, instead of just randomly throwing in details, the author had a purpose for each event. Rather than Tub randomly shooting Kenny without any cause or effect to it, Wolff builds up the suspense by using acts such as Kenny picking on Tub because of his weight -- which is sadly a real life problem -- or Kenny seemingly getting angry and losing it over a bad day of hunting. Wolff adds effect to each event by using real life issues such as bullying, or maybe even having a bad day, to act as a catalyst for each event and to serve as something for each character to learn from and reflect upon.

By contrast, “The Most Dangerous Game” describes enough of General Zaroff's life and demeanor for the reader to realize he is...
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