Human Trafficing

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Ivan Garibay
Professor Godinez
English 101
12 December 2011
Human Trafficking
It is estimated that the yearly profits generated from the industry of human trafficking is $32 billion. When people are trafficked they lose their freedom and are illegally transported across or within countries borders. The U.S. Department of States estimates that 14,500 to 17,500 individuals are trafficked into the U.S. from foreign countries, and over 4 million people are trafficked every year. Human trafficking has become a worldwide problem, which still has not been able to be stopped even with laws or acts that fight against it. There are many factors of human trafficking, like poverty, broken homes, and corruption. Poverty is one of the greatest factors of human trafficking because most poor people have less educational and stable job opportunities. Traffickers play to these faults by telling lies like promising better economic lives. Most American victims are people who are disaffected, running away, or children who are casted away. Official corruption and organized crime are more factors of trafficking, where police officers take bribes to overlook women in sex trades. According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) at least eight organized crime groups are trafficking women (Cullen-DuPont). One factor that comes into play a lot with human trafficking is gender. In statistics today say that adult women are most frequently trafficked, then minors, which is about 6 girls to every boy. The smallest group of people trafficked are men. Gender inequality is a major factor in the use of fraud to enslave women. In many countries, the most common are poor countries, girls have fewer education opportunities than boys. With human trafficking people can be trafficked through places ranging from people’s homes to a nationwide network. In the U.S. most victims are found in brothels, strip clubs, private homes, fields, factories, and street corners. There are many different types of human trafficking. One of the biggest types is sexual exploitation. About 98% of people trafficked into sexual exploitation are female and 2% are male. The U.S. 2005 Tip Report said that the legalization of prostitution would increase the amount of trafficking women. Today most cases of women are being trafficked into prostitution through debt bondage. Which is where a person is set up into an arrangement where they have to pay off a loan with labor instead of money, which are also held through sexual force and violence by their traffickers. For example in the trial U.S. vs. Maksimenko two men were trafficking at least nine women from Russia and Ukraine, held in servitude as exotic dancers in their Michigan strip clubs. The men were holding these women captive through the use of force, which included rape. Young girls are usually trafficked by “lover boys”, which are men who seduce vulnerable young women and girls and force them into prostitution. They are also trafficked through their own families; traffickers tell the daughter’s parents that they can have an extremely better life compared to the poverty they are already in. In sexual exploitation there is also child sex tourism, which is usually practiced by men who travel away from their own countries to perform sex acts with children. A 2002 report said more than 5,000 woman had been trafficked from Eastern Europe, the Philippines, and Russia to be prostituted to the U.S. service men stationed in South Korea. Two forms of human trafficking that are also common and brought together by one main thing which is the internet, are forced marriage, and baby selling. In many countries young and forced marriage is very common. Forced marriages are arranged but without the consent of both people, most of the time it is without the woman’s consent. People like their parents or community leaders can either set up women, so they can be sold or traded to her new husband. Most victims of forced...
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