Huckleberry Finn

Topics: Tom Sawyer, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain Pages: 3 (905 words) Published: February 25, 2006
This essay will analyze the themes of religion, slavery, and democracy in the book Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. By exploring these themes that lie behind the book's veneer, we can see how Twain had an objective when he wrote this book. That is, he hoped to achieve a wide symbolic scope. By unveiling the themes that are present in the book, we can see what Twain stood for and why he wrote this novel in the period he lived in.

An Analytical Essay on Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
This essay will analyze the themes of religion, slavery, and democracy in the book Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. By exploring these themes that lie behind the book's veneer, we can see how Twain had an objective when he wrote this book. That is, he hoped to achieve a wide symbolic scope. By unveiling the themes that are present in the book, we can see what Twain stood for and why he wrote this novel in the period he lived in.

Religion is sarcastically reflected in Huckleberry Finn by Twain's sense of storyline and the way his characters talk. A predominant theme, and probably one of Twain's favorites, is the mockery of religion. Twain tended to attack organized religion at every opportunity and the sarcastic character of Huck Finn is perfectly situated to allow him to do so. The attack on religion can already be seen in the first chapter, when Huck indicates that hell sounds like a lot more fun than heaven. This will continue throughout the novel, with one prominent scene occurring when the "King" convinces a religious community to give him money so he can "convert" his pirate friends.

Twain's skeptical take on religion can be elicited because superstition is a theme that both Huck and Jim bring up several times. Although both of these characters tend to be quite rational, they quickly become irrational when anything remotely superstitious happens to them. The role of superstition in this book is two-fold: First, it shows that Huck and Jim are child-like in spite of...
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