How to Write a Thesis Statement

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 295
  • Published : March 5, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
How Do I Write a Thesis Statement? 
What is a thesis statement?  A thesis statement is a very specific argument that guides your paper. Generally, a thesis statement consists of two parts:    1. a clearly identifiable topic or subject matter, and    2. a succinct summary of what you have to say about that topic    A thesis functions like the case a lawyer has to make to the judge and jury in a courtroom. An effective thesis statement  explains to your reader the case you are going to make and how you are going to make it. Your thesis also helps to keep  you focused as writer and determine what information you do (or don’t) need to include in your analysis.    Traditionally, the thesis statement is found near the end of your introduction, though this may change depending on the  assignment. Don’t be afraid to draft a thesis statement that is more than one sentence.     Note also: You do not need a perfect thesis statement before you draft the rest of the paper. In fact, you will likely need  to modify your thesis once you have a complete draft to make sure that your paper does what your thesis says it will.  Honing and tweaking a thesis statement during the revision process is ultimately more important than having it exact  and precise during the drafting process  Characteristics of a WEAK thesis statement:  Vague: Raises an interesting topic or question but doesn’t specify an argument  Offers plot summary, statement of fact, or obvious truths instead of an argument  Offers opinion or conjecture rather than an argument (cannot be proven with textual evidence)  Is too broad or too complex for the length of the paper  Uses meaningful‐sounding words but doesn’t say anything    Disclaimer: This is not a complete list! You can probably think of many more characteristics of a weak thesis statement.  Characteristics of a STRONG thesis statement:  Answers a specific question  Takes a distinct position on the topic ...
tracking img