How does DH lawrence present childhood in Piano

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 532
  • Published : March 3, 2014
Open Document
Text Preview
“Piano” shows a man recalling his childhood as he is listening to a woman singing. This poem reflects his mood of nostalgia and pathos; the speaker is longing for the simplicity and comfort of years gone by. We can discover that there is an ambiguous, harmonious tone, which is accentuated by its structure and rhyme. It also insists of rich imagery that creates a vivid picture for audiences. It is a relatively short poem that has only three stanzas, but Lawrence conveys the main theme of ambiguous, bitterness and sweetness of nostalgia simply and honestly. D.H. Lawrence structures the poem with a simple rhyming scheme, using this rhyming pattern to mimic the form of a song. Because the music in this poem triggers a memory, it is structured and progresses much like a song. “To the old Sunday evenings at home, with winter outside/and hymns in the cosy parlour, the tinkling piano our guide” The piano is a guide for both himself and the reader through his recollection. The song-like rhythm to the poem tries to imitate the melody of woman’s music which prompted this memory. As the melody evolves and his memory gets clearer, so does the poem’s structure. Apart from the fact that rhyme what seem to make Lawrence’s poem like a song. He uses a trochaic structure, stressing the first syllable of each line. This causes the effect of a song. The form creates a song-like rhythm similar to a hymn or more specifically a nursery rhyme connects the readers to their own childhood memories. The naive, or rather simplistic language in first stanza alludes to childhood as well. For example, 4th and 5th lines of the poem: “A child sitting under the piano, in the boom of the tingling strings; And pressing the small poised feet of a mother who smiles as she sings.” The use of this simplistic language makes reader feels nostalgic, involving with narrator’s linkage, returning to their childhood. Although the beginning of “Piano” illustrates a child-like rhyme, the second and third...
tracking img