How Accurate Is Huxleys Vision of the Future.

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 461
  • Published : April 21, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Back To the Future
In a world where people have sex all the time, take drugs to make themselves happier, and have no parents to tell them what to do, they have fun all the time. Huxley’s vision of the future sounds like a college kids dream. Huxley’s vision in his novel, Brave New World, describes a future that will never happen.

Huxley’s vision of the future describes a delusion because the United States acts stubborn. We do not agree to anything most countries do, like the math system, language, and currency. The United States acts on its own. No one controls the United States. Most people from our country behave conservatively. People live off religion, it gives people hope that a paradise does exist even in a tough world called life. No person would agree to have sex all the time with anyone and everyone. People want love and a monogamous relationship. People also have jealousy issues. Americans act possessive, no person wants to give up family; it teaches loyalty and love. Most of the rules in Huxley’s novel sound illegal. Five year olds play erotic games; this screams child pornography. What sick person would force children to have sex with each other? The caste system correlates to India which falls under illegal activities. Most importantly, people have to do above and beyond geniuses to develop the test tube theory etc. The education systems in the United States, Canada, and Europe fabricate learning; the children’s mindset of school describes it as a place called hell. They have to meet certain requirements in order to discover ways to make people without sexual reproduction. Brave New World is impossible. Love makes people who they are. Without love; fairness, hope, faith, generosity, humanity, kindheartedness, and compassion would never exist. (“I want to know what passion is… I want to feel something strongly.” Aldous Huxley, Brave New World, p.102). Some points in the novel do run parallel with a near future of the United States, such as, no...
tracking img