Homelessness: the Effects of High Costs Housing

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Homelessness: The Effects of High Costs Housing
Excelsior College

Debra Parks

April 22, 2012


Abstract:
How many times have we saw people standing on the street in their dirty clothes with a sign saying, “work for food”? I wonder how this person got into their situation. In the past I’ve thought laziness, they don’t want to work, or maybe they have schizophrenia and are unable to work, or sometimes, I didn’t even see them. What is the solution to the growing problem of homelessness? In this great land of ours, where on one side of the town, there are millionaires, and on the other, people sleeping on park benches, sometimes with their children.

Introduction:
Statistics on the actual number of homeless people is hard to extract because homelessness is usually a temporary not permanent condition. Depending on where the stats are extrapolated, the numbers range between 600,000 to two million. According to the Alliance to End Homelessness, between 2.5 and 3.5 million people will experience homelessness during the year, with more than one million being children. Women with children are a growing portion of the homeless population. Women living with a controlling or abusive partner decide to leave Most of these women do not have the education or skills in order to become self-sufficient, causing them to either move in with relatives or in shelters. It’s hard for us to comprehend in this great land of ours, the millions of people that are without shelter. Some of the causes of homelessness are mental illness, low wages, inflation, and the high cost of housing. Some think it’s a tragedy that causes homelessness, however usually, it’s a series of events such as; illness causing one to get behind on their rent, a major car repair, domestic violence, or natural catastrophe such as Katrina. I will examine the issue of high housing cost. Thoughts on Homelessness:

How many times have we saw people standing on the street in their dirty clothes with a sign saying, “work for food”? I wonder how this person got into their situation. In the past I’ve thought laziness, they don’t want to work, or maybe they have schizophrenia and are unable to work, or sometimes, I didn’t even see them. Approximately a year ago, I had a patient on the unit I worked. She was from a home for unwed mothers; she went into labor and was brought to our hospital to give birth. She delivered a beautiful baby girl. Apparently, a year prior, she had been kicked out of her mother’s house and was living on the streets. When she became pregnant, she was place in the shelter home unwed mothers. The problem was after she delivered the home wouldn’t take her back, because they were not set up to take care of babies. The social worker got involved trying to find her a place to go with her newborn infant. She had no job, no skills, and no family willing to take her in. It seemed to be an impossible task. This patient ended up remaining in the hospital three extra days while we were trying to find placement in a shelter. Eventually, the social worker found a temporary place in a homeless shelter to place her in another state. A worker from the shelter came to pick the woman and her baby up to transport them to the shelter, although, she would only be able to remain there thirty days. I still wonder where they went after the month was over. I have worked in hospitals where there were no attempts at finding these women placement. When it was time for discharge, they would leave the hospital walking, carrying the baby. What is the solution to the growing problem of homelessness? In this great land of ours, where on one side of the town, there are millionaires, and on the other, people sleeping on park benches, sometimes with their children. Some Facts:

According to Hunger and Homelessness, A Status Report on Hunger and Homelessness in America’s Cities, (2008), Of...
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