High School Drop-Outs

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 780
  • Published : February 13, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
When one out of three students fails to graduate in the nation, there has to be a main issue, a source of frustration or maybe hopelessness, causing students to give up on their educations when they had an opportunity to go further. When people feel that there is no hope or chance, they will give up. This is what is happening to high-school students leading them to drop-out of school despite the fact that a high-school diploma could be so beneficial to their lives and the fact that it can be prevented.

In the article “High School Dropouts Costly to American Economy”, Sarah White said, “The teachers didn’t care, the students didn’t care. Nobody cared, so why should I?” I believe that in order for students to want to work in high school to achieve their diplomas, they need emotional support and a motivational backbone. When I made a good grade when I was little or even now, my parents and my teacher were there to praise me and push me to do even better and work toward higher educational goals. Because of their support, I want to do well in school and aim high in school and towards college. Without their support, advice and expectations, I probably wouldn’t care about school; this is what high school-dropouts need and are lacking.

Just earning a high school diploma can improve the standard of living for a person significantly. The article “By the Numbers: Dropping Out of High School” says, “The average dropout can expect to earn an annual income of $20,241, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. That’s a full $10,386 less than the typical high school graduate, and $36,424 less than someone with a bachelor degree.” With numbers as drastic as this, schools need to not only work to get students to graduate, but desire to work for at least a bachelor’s degree in higher education for the benefit of the students.

Many successful programs to improve this situation are have already been created; more schools simply need to work them into their systems. The Boys &...
tracking img