Henry Iv Part Ii

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 501
  • Published : February 24, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
Autumn Earle
November 16, 2010
Second Period
Shakespeare's writing for his speeches captures an audiences’ attention. In the play, King Henry IV Part II, Shakespeare writes a soliloquy about a monarch who is angry and frustrated with the inability to sleep. Shakespeare uses diction, imagery, and syntax to evoke the feelings of the King to display his mind set. As an individual reads King Henry’s words, one experiences a flow of emotion.

In a multitude of instances, diction can be found in William Shakespeare’s soliloquy to illustrate the Monarch’s state of mind. One of the simplest types of technique is personification; Shakespeare writes “Nature’s soft nurse” to exemplify this method. Shakespeare uses the lines: “O sleep! O gentle sleep!”, “O thou dull god,” and “O partial sleep,” all to show repetition and the weeping Henry is carrying out. With a sentence such as: “no more wilt weigh my eyelids down,” Shakespeare speaks out saying please let me sleep. The sibilant alliteration Henry’s states in this line “steep my senses in forgetfulness!” exhibits his solemn, sad tone. Shakespeare uses hyperboles to create the atmosphere of how wonderful and blessed King Henry’s bedroom is with sweet melodies and beautiful drapes. The King applies the questions of why the ship boy can sleep in a terrible storm, and he is awake with no rage of the water to keep him stirring. Sleep, enraging and insulting the King, as if it has god-like qualities, continues to deny him; yet, gives itself to the poor, the hungry, and the sick. Even though the emperor has everything and more, his immense amount of wealth cannot help him with his sanity or overcome the pressure that comes with being the king.

Just as language sways the emotions of the author, imagery is critical in the way the writer produces his or her literary pieces. Gustatory, visual, tactile, and auditory illustrations are found in this selection. Shakespeare writes, “buzzing night-flies” and “of sweetest melody,”...
tracking img