Hard Rock Music as Positive Social Force

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Music has been a part of the human societies for thousands of years. Instances of music can be found in every known culture on earth. It is often said that music is a universal language and this is true since almost all humans seem to like some kind of music. Many people listen to music for entertainment but new research has concluded that music can greatly affect our moods and temperaments and can work to provide our brains with an environment that is conducive to many things. Much of research has shown listening to such music as Bach or Beethoven can even enhance a person’s intellectual thoughts and serve him better memory stores. It is said that Thomas Jefferson wrote the Declaration of Independence with the help of music. The smartest man who ever lived, Albert Einstein, also knew how to play the violin. Research has proven that music affects humans in various ways. Music can have both a positive as well as a negative effect on the human brain. It is mostly argued that hard rock, a kind of a noisy and loud music, one that has accompaniments of distorted guitars, earsplitting drums, and vociferous vocal, has a very negative effect on the human mind, and thus on our society at large. Many studies have found that listening to hard rock music has some negative effects on the human mind (e.g. Friedman, 1959). Greenberg and Fisher (1971) conducted a study in which they played some background music to people who were studying, and it was discovered that those subjects who heard loud, hard rock type music did not attempt the test very well. A study conducted by Henderson, Crews, and Barlow (1945) discovered that some of the subjects on a paragraph comprehension test were distracted by popular music while the hard rock music had adverse effects on the vocabulary test scores. Wolf and Weiner (1972) conducted a study that concluded that there were certain significant differences between the performances of students on arithmetic tests who listened to hard rock music...
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