Haiti as a Potential Disaster Tourism Destination

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 143
  • Published : May 22, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
[Type text]

Haiti as a Potential Disaster Tourism Destination

Aleksandr Gorbenko Certificate in International Hotel and Tourism Management

HTMi Switzerland

0

[Type text]

Table of Content

Introduction ............................................................................... 2 Historical Manifestations of Dark Tourism ........................... 2 Dark Tourism Motivation ....................................................... 3 Positive Sides of Dark Tourism ............................................ 6 Haiti as a Potential Disaster Tourism Destination ......... 7 Conclusion ................................................................................... 8 Recommendations .................................................................... 9 References ................................................................................... 9

1

[Type text]

Introduction
Disaster tourism is a sub-category of grief tourism, or as it more commonly known – dark tourism (or thanatotourism). Dark tourism is the act of travelling and visiting to different places all around the globe, where death o r deadly actions took place (The Dark Tourism Forum 2005.). It includes travel to former sites of mass destruction, like Ground Zero after events 9/11 in New York City, and others, like battlefields, concentration camps, where millions of people died in tortures during the wars (Soanes 2006.). Disaster tourism is more specific type of grief tourism, which refers to visiting attractions and exhibitions of natural disasters. Some places are more exposed and vulnerable to natural disasters, some of them - not. But one thing can be stated certainly: disasters theoretically can happen anytime and anywhere (Redcross 2010.).

Historical Manifestations of Dark Tourism
Dark tourism is not a new phenomenon, people started to be the participants of dark tourism, when there was no even such term like dark tourism or tourism at all. For example the Roman gladiator fights. The first games were held in Rome in 264 BCE (Fowler 2006.). This death attraction gained popularity among people of Rome very quickly. The arenas were full of people who desired to look and see the fight, which led to death of participants. Another example is medieval public hanging and other different types of executions. In

2

[Type text]

middle Ages it was the biggest attraction. First experience of mass tourism – 1841, Great Britain, Thomas Cook organized a rail journey for 500 travellers (Page 2009.). The sites they visited included American Civil War battlefields and witnessing two murderers being hanged (Sharpley 2009.). Mark Twain also was a leader of the group of tourists who had visited the destroyed city of Sebastopol after the Crimean War. Those who followed him were taking small parts of shrapnel as a souvenir. Victorian England – travellers visited morgues. Tragedy and death have always attracted people, since very ancient times (Women on the road 2010.).

Dark Tourism Motivation
According to The Dark Tourism (2010), investigating why people travel to certain places and do certain things is relevant to two reasons: academic investigation and tourism management. Several researches have been made in previous years and the connection was found between tourist motivation and different forms of human behaviour, which are relevant to hospitality management and theoretical perception of motivation. Illustrations of such kind of behaviour are the information sources used and the choice of destination, as well as the mode, or the way of travel. Motivation of dark tourism is relatively new subject of research and we think it is important due to the rapid development of dark tourism in the past few years. According to Dunkley (2006), there is no single reason or motivation, which could justify the willingness of people to travel to sites where people 3

[Type text]

have died as a result of a disaster, whether natural or...
tracking img