Group of Seven

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Group of Seven, Painting, Canadian painters
  • Pages : 4 (1030 words )
  • Download(s) : 612
  • Published : September 18, 2007
Open Document
Text Preview
Section A

My defining moment in Canadian history is the Group of Seven. The Group of Seven consisted of seven Canadian painters in the 1920's. They originally consisted of: Franklin Carmichael, Arthur Lismer, Lawren Harris, A.Y. Jackson, J.E.H. MacDonald, F.H. Varley, and Frank Johnston. However many others were also a part of it, such as Tom Thomson, Emily Carr and Edwin Holgate. Tom Thompson wasn't an official member since he died before the group was considered "official". Emily Carr was also not an official member of the group due to the status of women at the time. Women weren't considered equal to men, however the group admired Emily and really wanted her to be a part of it.

The Group of Seven were very unique painters. They would travel around Canada and paint the lovely Canadian landscape. The Group was temporarily split during World War I. Jackson Varley became the official war artist. The group reunited after the war but Tom Thomson had died due to an injury in the head while falling of a canoe. Toronto was the headquarters for the Group of Seven. Some travelled east and others into the far north to capture the Canadian landscape, yet the city was the centre of activity and the urban environment naturally found its way into the Group's work. Environmental artist Simon Frank, usually painted in the Toronto region. The Group of Seven have many wonderful paintings. The following are places where the group have painted in: Midland Ontario, Montreal, Toronto, Yukon, Algonquin Park, British Columbia, Lake Superior and Nova Scotia.

Section B

The Group of Seven had a very unique style. The Group used to generate public interest in the arts at the time by building up a collector base, developing popular audience, creating an aura around their artworks, expanding arts education, spreading their ideas, etc. The Group of Seven argued strongly against pastoral painting and impressionism (style of painting, smooth, very true to nature), claiming it...
tracking img