Green Grow the Rashes

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"Green Grow the Rashes"

Robert Burns' poem, "Green Grow the Rashes" is a very simple poem. The main theme to the poem is the praise of the female gender. Throughout the poem Burns comments on what females mean to him, and how wonderful they are. "The sweetest hours that e'er I spend,

Are spent among the lasses, O.
(Robert Burns)

With this statement in the first stanza of the poem, Burns attempts to make his point on females. The happiest times of his life are spent in the company of women. All the other points in his life do not compare to the times he has been with females. He also makes the point that every worry that he has in the world would disappear if he were able to be with his love. No matter what burdens life has put onto his shoulders, Burns' feels that all those problems would dissolve if he was to be with a woman for a mere hour of his life. This is seen in the following quotation: "But gie me a cannie hour at e'en,

My arms about my dearie, O,
An' war'ly cares an' war'ly men
May a' gae tapsalteerie, O!"
(Robert Burns)

Burns goes on to say that even the wisest man, a reference to King Solomon, in the world was so consumed with the greatness of women. In the final stanza Burns' makes a statement that once men were created, God went on to create women, and that they were to be an improvement over men. The poem is very short, yet to the point and precise. Burns builds up the story on how great women are, and than completes the poem by complimenting them. It is a great work of literature that shows admiration and feeling for a specific article. He uses examples to make the everything relative to females. Nothing in his mind could compare to a woman and what she would mean to him. It is a great power if a specific could ease the troubles of the world by just being there. Burns expresses his thoughts very freely and imaginatively
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