Great Allusion

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Knowing what an allusion is, is the firs is exactly how the allusion of the World Series of 1919 is mentioned in Fitzgerald’s novel the Great Gatsby. The fixing of the World Series is mentioned in passing but it creates an underlying sense of mystery to the novel that is previously not as prevalent. This allusion introduces not only the character of Meyer Wolfsheim, but also tells the reader a little more about Gatsby. This allusion also develops the American dream.

Gatsby had always been a mysterious character, but only because little was known about him. After this encounter, Gatsby’s character truly takes on a mysterious persona, one of underground relations. Prior to this, the only mention of Gatsby having such shady connections is a rumor that Nick heard durin upon such large amounts of money. The American dream shows that the West Egg inhabitants became wealthy through many different means; illegal activity could just as easily be one of them.

Meyer Wolfsheim is introduced at this time. He is the only major character that is directly associated to underground activity. Fitzgerald displays him as a person with only mischievous interests, and because of this reason, the reader develops a major dislike for the character. But when viewed from the perspective of the American dream, Wolfsheim is just like every other person trying to get rich. This can be seen when he fixes the World Serieons: First, it further developed the character of Gatsby showing his shady and more secretive attributes. Second, it introduces Meyer Wolfsheim and although he is directly associated with underground activity, it also shows his sense of the American dream. And finally, this allusion enriches the novel with the theme of the American dream.
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