Graphic Designer

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pure design

mario garcia pure design
79 SIMPLE SOLUTIONS FOR MAGAZINES B O O KS , N E W S PA P E R S , A N D W E B S I T E S

MILLER MEDIA
S T. P E T E R S B U R G , F L O R I D A

Published by Miller Media St. Petersburg, Florida © 2002 Dr. Mario Garcia All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in whole or in part without permission from the publisher, except by a reviewer who may quote brief passages in a review, nor may any part of this book be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or other, without written permission from the publisher. Special thanks to Dr. Pegie Stark Adam, Rodrigo Fino, Mario Garcia, Jr., Ed Hashey, Mignon Kagnie, Aaron Kenedi, Jan Kny, Theresa Kral, Elena Lazaro, John Miller, Robert Newman, Ron Reason, Paul Ripoll, and Robyn Spoto. Cover and interior design by Miller Media Research by Robyn Spoto and Elena Lazaro Copy editing and proofreading by Mimi Kusch Front cover photograph courtesy of GettyOne Images Aesop fable image courtesy of Mr. Agustin Edwards Library of Congress CIP ISBN 0-9724696-0-5

Printed in Spain 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

To the memory of my father, whose passion for his craft inspired my own M.G.

Last year, I was lucky enough to be in Chile, as a guest of Mr. Agustin Edwards, the publisher of El Mercurio. At one point, Mr. Edwards took me into his magnificent library to show me several rare books, among which was an illuminated manuscript, circa 1495, of Aesop’s Fables. In addition to admiring the Gothic-style lettering and the 66 miniature illustrations drawn in liquid gold, I recognized instantly the author’s ability to tell a complete story in a few lines. Aesop was a precursor of the Internet, I thought. One does not need to “scroll” to read an entire fable. Whata utilitarian and “modern” way to present valuable information. The inspiration for the short “fables” in this book was born there. — DR. MARIO GARCIA SEPTEMBER 1, 2002

contents
foreword
JOHN MILLER xi

introduction
MARIO GARCIA 1

words
HOW TO TELL A STORY 11

type
HOW TO USE FONTS 43

layout
H O W TO B U I L D A PAG E 7 5

color
H O W T O C R E AT E PA L E T T E S 1 3 7

pictures
HOW TO USE PICTURES 159

process
HOW TO MAKE A REDESIGN WORK 187 APPENDIX

ten myths of design
201

acknowledgments
210

foreword
JOHN MILLER

If I had designed 450 newspapers and been called the most important newspaper designer in the world, I’d be tempted to rest on my laurels. Not Mario Garcia. The architect behind some of the most successful redesigns in the world, including The Wall Street Journal (U.S., Europe, and Asia), Die Zeit (Germany), El Mercurio (Chile), El Tiempo (Colombia), Liberation (France) and The San Jose Mercury News, Mario Garcia continues to be a visionary leader in the world of publication design. For the last thirty years, he has championed ideas about readability, storytelling, and multiple points of entry and has helped define how content is presented in all media with one fundamental goal in mind: always design with the reader in mind. But today readers have changed. People are inundated from so many directions they don’t have the time to make sense of it all. They flip, they scan, and they surf. All at once. Scarborough Research recently reported that 91 percent of Internet users with a TV in the same room surfed and watched television simultaneously! (We usually blame the web for this, but it probably should fall on remote controls, the device with which people began seriously determining whether or not they were interested in a television station—within five seconds.) xi

mario garcia

Editors and designers have responded by cramming in more and more and more and more, cranking up the volume in a cacophony of grueling, information-dense pages and mesmerizing, whirring screens. But Mario’s response is a new kind of design: Clean,...
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