Globalization

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Globalism

Globalism can be defined as being the interconnection of countries and cultures around the world. This connection contains many different aspects, such as political, culture, consumerism, and economic. Though globalism has existed for thousands of years in some shape, the advances in communication and transportation technology has made its current effects much more apparent than ever before. Through a thorough examination of globalism's origins and its current modern form, one will have an understanding of just how interconnected the world has truly become.

Though globalism has existed for thousands of years, its original form was much different than it is now. Perhaps the most famous example of globalism was the Silk Road, which extended and connected the continents of Asia, Europe, and Africa. This road, named because of the coveted silk that was often traded, was an example of the positives that globalization can bring. Religion, languages, cultures, arts, food, and music were rapidly exchanged at this time. However, because it covered such great distances, the exchanges weren't done rapidly. (Nye)

The next great example of globalism, and some say where modern globalism began, was when the Europeans discovered North and South America and the islands of the "New World." After the Europeans made their discoveries beginning at the end of the 15th century, there was a worldwide shift of people, goods, and ideas, such as religion, that followed. The discovery of the New World brought with it the spread of foods, insects, and animals around the world. Most people are surprised to learn, for example, that the reason why there are tomatoes in Italy today is because it spread from the New World. Starting early in the 19th century, transportation technology had advanced significantly to the CHEN 2

point where traveling was both much faster and much more efficient (Nye). Steamships and railroads greatly allowed for both people and goods to...
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