Germination of Mustard Seeds Using Fertiliser

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Germination of Mustard Seeds using Fertilisers
1. Abstract
This study was done to look at the effects of fertilisers and identify which fertiliser produced the fastest results. Four types of fertilisers were used over a four-week period and the findings were that inorganic fertilisers enhanced seed germination rates. 2. Introduction

Fertilisers are widely used in agricultural production because they contain essential compounds such as phosphorus, nitrogen and potassium that have been depleted from most Australian soil. The phosphorus is responsible for the development of the plants, providing healthy growth and strong roots. Nitrogen furnishes a major component of chlorophyll where it’s known for its ability to grow green leaves. Potassium provides a measure of disease resistance to plants and protection from the cold. (7) Farmers use these nutrients enrich the plants ability to grow and perform its various functions to produce crops. However, these compounds are not always found in the soil because Australia is an old continent and the minerals have been eroded or leached away over countless millennium, so fertilisers are used to replenish the lost nutrients that are needed for a healthy plant-life. (8) (4) Each fertiliser contains different nutrients and amount of concentrations, so depending on what nutrients are required to enrich the soil, the fertiliser will affect the plant-life outcome. This investigation provides an insight into the use of fertilisers and shows which fertiliser germinates the seeds fastest. Fertilisers are classified into two categories; organic and inorganic. Organic fertiliser is fundamentally the remaining’s of animal and/or vegetable matter whereas inorganic fertiliser is primarily derived from chemical compounds. (6) This experiment will study the effects of different types of fertilisers on mustard seeds. The expectation is that mustard seeds germinated in liquefied fertilisers such as Seaweed and Miracle Growth (a solution of powder and water) will grow quickly but seeds germinated in Blood and Bone (which needs to be added to the soil) and Slow Release (slow release pellets) will take a longer period to grow. 3. Materials and Method

The materials used in this experiment were; 100 mustard seeds, Miracle Growth fertiliser, Blood and Bone fertiliser, Seaweed fertiliser, Slow Release fertiliser, tap water, 5 pot plants to plant the seeds in, potting mix, watering can, labels and gloves. To find which fertiliser was most appropriate to use, an experiment took place over a four-week period. Five pots were labelled according to the fertilisers and (with gloves) four pots were filled with potting mix roughly half full. The last pot was filled with blood and bone fertiliser. 20 mustard seeds were placed in each pot about 1 cm deep and covered. Slow release, miracle growth and seaweed fertilisers were included in designated pots. The pots were watered and placed in part-shade part-sun location as this is the optimal situation for growing mustard seeds. The pots were watered every 2-3days and miracle growth and seaweed fertilisers were added to designated pots once a week. 4. Results

19th June (7 days)|
Fertiliser| Germination| Approx. Height (cm)| Stem colour| Slow Release| 3| 2| Green|
Miracle Growth| 16| 2.6| Brown/Green|
Seaweed| 19| 3.5| Light Purple/ Brown|
No Fertiliser| 19| 3.5| Brown/Green|
Blood and Bone| 0| 0| -|
24th June (12 days)|
Slow Release| 6| 3| Green|
Miracle Growth| 17| 5| Brown/Green|
Seaweed| 19| 5.5| Light Purple/ Brown|
No Fertiliser| 19| 4.8| Brown/ Green|
Blood and Bone| 0| 0| -|
9th July (27 days)|
Slow Release| 8| 5.8| Purple/ Green|
Miracle Growth| 17| 6.6| Light Purple/ Green|
Seaweed| 19| 7.3| Deep Purple/ Brown|
No Fertiliser| 19| 6.3| Purple/ Green|
Blood and Bone| 0| 0| -|
Slow Release fertiliser had the slowest growth rate, and lowest germination...
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