Geothermal Energy: Rare Renewable Energy

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  • Topic: Geothermal power, Geothermal heating, Geothermal heat pump
  • Pages : 26 (9820 words )
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  • Published : September 16, 2012
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Geothermal Energy: Rare Renewable Energy
Sharica Greene
Lucas Hackett
Amy Keller
Beverly Miller
Christine Muntz
Professor Scott Maxon
DeVry University

Geothermal Energy: Rare Renewable Energy
Outline
Team D
Thesis Statement

Beverly Miller
Introduction
Conclusion

Christine Muntz
The History of Geothermal Energy

Sharica Greene
Producing/ Generating Electricity
Geothermal Opportunities
Geothermal Issues
Cost
Capacity

Amy Keller
Economics Advantages of Geothermal Energy

Lucas Hackett
Sustainability
Geothermal Power
Extraction of Fluids & Electricity
Environmental Effects
Geothermal Environmental Positives
Geothermal Environmental Negatives

Geothermal Energy: Rare Renewable Energy
Geothermal energy is taking a grand position in transcending the ecosphere towards an uncontaminated, more sustainable energy configuration. It is one of the rare renewable energy technologies that can provide new level unlimited possibilities for the future of the use and constant load on a power supply. Introduction

From the creation of the Earth, energy has been present. Before man walked the Earth, the Sun provided heat to the planet below. As men began to walk the earth, they used the warmth of the sun during the day to search for food. At night when the stars and moon scarcely gave light, they had to find shelter and warmth. Eventually, fire was discovered which was able to provide heat and light during the night, and assisted with providing protection against dangerous animals. Fire was the first energy source they could control. As time went on, accidental discoveries were made using fire. Once they realized fire could be used to cook food, it made meals easier to chew. Fire was used to make stronger tools to hunt with. Fire was an energy source that made life easier. For many years to come, fire was the only source of controlled energy used until people discovered wind. Wind could move objects from one place to another. By capturing the wind in sails, people were able to move boats, making wind the first source of energy used in transportation. Wind was later used to move windmills and water wheels to move mechanics to help in grinding grains and pump water and run sawmills. In different cultures around the world, people would discover natural sources that would also provide energy. Oils floating on water would be collected to burn for light. Coal was discovered and used to bake clay pots. And through these uses additional discoveries were made. By burning natural gas and heating sea water, salt was extracted. Eventually, people were able to pipe gas from shallow wells. This energy, geothermal energy, comes from inside the Earth. http://www.need.org/needpdf/infobook_activities/ElemInfo/HistoryE.pdf Geothermal comes from the Greek word geo meaning earth and therme meaning heat. This Earth heat is produced from inside the earth and is a constant source. This heat begins from the earth’s core, 4000 miles deep with temperatures close to 9,000 degrees Fahrenheit. As people discovered that this energy could be used in many ways, man established locations, power plants, to facilitate heat or hot water from reservoirs to provide force to spin turbine generators and produces electricity. This geothermal water is then returned to the reservoir to be reheated. A few examples of geothermal power plants include: 1) “A "dry'" steam reservoir produces steam but very little water. The steam is piped directly into a "dry" steam power plant to provide the force to spin the turbine generator. The largest dry steam field in the world is The Geysers, about 90 miles north of San Francisco. Production of electricity started at The Geysers in 1960, at what has become the most successful alternative energy project in history. 2) A geothermal reservoir that produces mostly hot water is called a "hot water reservoir" and is used in a "flash" power plant. Water ranging in temperature from 300 - 700 degrees F...
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