Gendered World of Women in Latin America

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 152
  • Published : January 23, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
The Gendered Worlds of Latin American Women Workers looks at the livelihood of women in Latin America that have come to work in the factories in the early 1900s. This book focuses on the integration of customary work with accounts of issues of women. It also accounts on the exploitation and work of females in the labor of industry in the mid 1900s. It investigates the mind of working women. The essays show an abundance of stories concerning the lives of women as kids, parents, workers and women with their hand in politics. Women who worked these hostile factories had to endure constant harassment. However they still worked these factory jobs despite this. With nine essays dealing with various countries the writers make use o the testimonies of the women who go against the typical life of a woman in the world of machismo. Included in this boo are conversations of past themes that are rarely spoken of. These include motherhood and the working woman in industrialized world. Let’s start with the beginning. In the opening of the book the authors express the reasons for writing this book. First, they tried to fix the previous history that contained little if any records of women in the factories.  The others are to show how the incorporating of women in industrial work went. To fully grasp this they needed to show how men and women coped while working alongside one another and annotate their differences in ideals.  Something unique about this book is that all the essays use verbatim, the spoken words of those women who work in the factories day in and day out. These essays coming from these industrialized women push into new terrain as women, for the first time show how their sexualized worlds mold their way of thinking. And again, coming from the women themselves. As previously stated, these essays are an integral part of this book.  James' use of  Doña Marí Roldán,  I believe,  is the best part of the book. James’ telling of Dona Mari’s story paints the backdrop...
tracking img