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Gender and Diversity

Content:
Abstract
Introduction
Definition of Gender Diversity
Culture and Gender
Defining Gender
The four levels of diversity

The Theories

The Objectives and The Approach
Conclusion
Acknowledgments
Reference

Abstract:

This paper presents a cultural perspective towards thinking about, and acting on, issues concerning gender and computer science and related fields. We posit and demonstrate that the notion of a gender divide in how men and women relate to computing, traditionally attributed to gender differences, is largely a result of cultural and environmental conditions. Indeed, the reasons for women entering – or not entering – the field of computer science have little to do with gender and a lot to do with environment and culture as well as the perception of the field. Appropriate outreach, education and interventions in the micro-culture can have broad impact, increasing participation in computing and creating environments where both men and women can flourish. Thus, we refute the popular notion that focusing on gender differences will enhance greater participation in computing, and propose an alternative, more constructive approach which focuses on culture.

Introduction:

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the Special Issue on gender and sex diversity in sport organizations. In An examination of gender influences in career mentoring, Joanne Leek, Barbara Orser, and Alan Riding examine a popular organizational strategy for attempting to deal with issues related to gender and diversity in the workplace. Mentoring programs have become common in large organisations, their aims usually toward overcoming barriers to women's upward mobility, yet little is known about gender influences on the mentoring relationship or on the choice to enter such relationships. frame their study with Ajzen's (1991) theory of planned behaviour and find no differences between males and females in their propensity to be mentored, as both are driven by a quest for knowledge and psychosocial support.

“Teaching in an Age of Diversity” focus on teaching courses on sensitive topics such as racism and investigates critical research and writings done by women on gender, race and ethnicity. Referring to real-life stories by women from the Third World about the process of migration, I attempt to connect the experiences of women of color in the north to women of color in the south. Definition of Gender Diversity:

The concept of diversity encompasses acceptance and respect. It means understanding that each individual is unique, and recognizing our individual differences. These can be along the dimensions of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, socio-economic status, age, physical abilities, religious beliefs, political beliefs, or other ideologies. It is the exploration of these differences in a safe, positive, and nurturing environment. It is about understanding each other and moving beyond simple tolerance to embracing and celebrating the rich dimensions of diversity contained within each individual. Diversity is a reality created by individuals and groups from a broad spectrum of demographic and philosophical differences. It is extremely important to support and protect diversity because by valuing individuals and groups free from prejudice, and by fostering a climate where equity and mutual respect are intrinsic."Diversity" means more than just acknowledging and/or tolerating difference. Diversity includes, therefore, knowing how to relate to those qualities and conditions that are different from our own and outside the groups to which we belong, yet are present in other individuals and groups. These include but are not limited to age, ethnicity, class, gender, physical abilities/qualities, race, sexual orientation, as well as religious status, gender expression, educational background, geographical location, income, marital status, parental status, and...
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