Future Technologies

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You wake up with a big stretch of your arms. You look outside and it is a beautiful June morning in the year 2075. It’s Sunday and you ask yourself, “What should I do today? The possibilities are limitless.” First things first, you check the weather so you know what to wear. Going on the weather website? No way, that is primitive. You turn to your nightstand that has a glass countertop and say “show me weather.” A 3D holographic display pops up and shows you what the temperature will be throughout the day. You they say, “show ideal clothing for such conditions.” Now all you have to do is put on the clothes that it tells you to, since it already has all of the clothing you own in its database. Your artificial intelligence robot makes breakfast for you. “Thank you Martha,” you say and after breakfast is done, find an activity to do. Why not walk your dog in the park? It’s a nice enough day. Now you have to decide whether you want to take your flying car, or use your self-driving car. Since the park is only about 10 minutes away you just take the robot car. In the middle of playing in the park with your dog, you get a call on the cell phone. It’s Martha your robot; she reminds you that you have a cancer therapy appointment today. Your car drives you back so you can drop off your dog and you take your flying car over the cancer specialist. There’s no painful chemo in this treatment, all you do is sit back and painlessly let the doctors do whatever it is they do. Just 80 years ago people never even thought about the type of technology that is so frequently used by us today. Imagine where technological advances could take us in just another 80 years. There are so many theories floating around right now of what the future can hold for us electronically. The possibilities are limitless because, well, look at how unbelievably fast technology developed in just the last ten years. A few of these theories caught my eye. Flying cars means faster means of transportation, but how safe do the words flying cars actually sound? The fact that cars will be flying means there will potentially be less of a possibility that people will use standard airfare as travel. This would also alleviate traffic conditions on ground, as people would start to use flying cars as travel. “We need to try to relieve congestion on our road, and one potential solution is an aerial vehicle,” says Dr. Michael Jump, in a BBC article flying cars: grounded reality or ready for takeoff. We all know traffic is invariably increasing, and I’m sure we would all like to get rid of that time-consuming rush hour traffic. What better way than to fly to your destination. What would happen if you had a full Tank in your air car? The sky is the limit. Well not anymore, as you’ll be soaring through the air at breakneck speeds looking for a beautiful country to spend the night in. On the other hand, let’s think for a second about the air travel we have today. Planes, in a way, are massive metal flying death machines. It takes so much, as in a huge engine, huge wings, and many other mechanical components that any non-pilot doesn’t know about, just to get this thing to fly. How are humans going to be able to get all of this technology into a tiny car without having major bugs? Not to mention the tremendous amount of skill one will need just to operate it. The same BBC article I mentioned before asks, “Introducing flying cars raises a number of issues, many of which have probably already run through your mind. Who will govern where they fly? Will they interfere with planes? What will stop a drunk driver (flier?) crashing into my house?” these are all prominent questions that need to be answered before the flying car can be available to the public. Want to be able to drive without having to actually do any work? Me too, let’s just hope this self-driving car doesn’t malfunction and crash. In the PCMAG.com article Mobile: self-driving cars, Author Billy Howard states, “Imagine a...
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