Foreign Literature About the Black Nazarene

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Foreign Literature
According to the classic statement of Karl Marx, “Religion is the sign of

oppressed creature, the heart of the heartless world … the spirit of a spiritless

situation. It is the opium of the people.”

According to an essay written by Charles H. Long, he had an experience of the holy in the Negro community (also known as the African-American people) which he interpreted came from the folkloric tradition. By that, he meant an oral tradition which existed in its integrity as an oral tradition, the writing down of which was a concession to scholarship.

His sources for his interpretation included slave narratives, sermons, the words and music of the spirituals and the blues, the cycle of Brer Rabbit, and High John the Conqueror stories. These materials, according to him, revealed a range of religious meanings extending from trickster-transformer hero to High Gods.

The imagery of the Bible plays a large role in the symbolic presentations.

The imagery of the Bible was used because it was at hand, it was adapted to and

invested with the experience of the slave. Strangely enough, it was the slaves

who gave a religious meaning to the notions of freedom and land. The

deliverance of the children of Israel from Egyptians became an archetype which

enabled him to lived with the promise.

God for this community appears as an all-powerful and moral deity,

though one hardly ever knows why He has willed this or that. God is never, or

hardly ever, blamed for the situation of man, for somehow in an inscrutable

manner there is a reason for all of this. By and large a fundamental distinction

was made between God and Jesus Christ.

To the extent that the language of Christianity is used, black Americans

have held to the Trinitarian distinction, but adherence to this distinction has been

for experiential rather than dogmatic reasons.

In addition, the experience of God is thus placed within the context of the other images and experiences of the Black Religion. Though biblical language

is used to speak of God’s historical presence and intervention in history, people

neither have a Hebraic nor what has become a Christian interpretation of the

history. People must remember that the historicity the two traditions, namely,

Hebraic and Traditional Christian, were related to the procession of a land, and

has not been the case for black in America. In one sense, it is possible to say
that their history in America has always presented to them a situation of crisis.

the intervention of the deity to their community has not been synonymous with

the confirmation of the reality of their being within the structure of America. God

has been more often a transformer of their consciousness, the basis for a

resource which enabled them to maintain the human image without completely

acquiescing to the norms of the majority population.

Relating to the book of Joseph Telushkin, “Jewish Wisdom,” and Elliot

N. Dorff, “Contemporary Jewish Theology: A Reader”, unlike Christianity and

Islam, Judaism has no official creed or universal doctrinal requirements for
membership. In general, a person can be considered "Jewish" whether

headheres to a complete system of beliefs about God and the afterlife, holds only

a few simple beliefs that give meaning to ritual, or even (at least in liberal

Judaism) does not believe in God at all.
This diversity in Jewish belief arises in part because actions (good deeds and the mitzvot), not beliefs, are the most important aspect of Jewish religious life. In addition, the term "Jewish" can be used to describe a race and a culture rather than a religion, so some who identify themselves as Jewish may have little interest in the beliefs and practices associated with the religion of Judaism. Nevertheless, the Torah and Talmud...
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