Family Assessment

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Family Assessment
a) Family form
A definition of family: “A family is two or more persons who are joined together by bonds of sharing and emotional closeness and who identify themselves as being part of a family.” Friedman (1997) The Jordan’s are a nuclear family. The family members include husband, wife and three children. Dad is forty four years old, Mom is forty one years old and the three boys are seven, nine and eleven. The children are all in school, the parents help the seven year old who is in second grade with his homework. While I was visiting, the youngest child was working on a book report. He was asking several questions of his Mom during the interview. The boy was very well-mannered and said “excuse me” before asking for help. The nine and eleven year old boys are quite independent with all their school work. When they have a bible reading schedule related to their worship, they read together as a family. b) Patterns of Interaction/Communication

The wife does all the domestic duties with the help of the oldest child. This family are Jehovah’s Witnessess and culturally, the husband is the bread winner of the house and should work hard to provide for the entire family. The wife should take care of all the house work. Jehovah’s Witnessess believe the wife should not work. The Mothers job is to make sure the entire family’s needs are met. This includes caring for her children emotionally, physically and psychologically. Like the Bowen’s Family Systems Theory, the family is seen as an emotional unit. I did observe Mrs. Jordan as a very compassionate, concerned and emotional mother. She was very serious when talking about her children; she felt strongly that the boys should be able to come to her with any issues, good or bad. Mrs. Jordan is also responsible for the family budget and finances. When asked “Who has the power and authority in our family?” Mrs. Jordan replied, “The Bible, Jehovah’s Word has the power in our family. It is the essence and the foundation of our family.” If there is a decision to be made that affects the whole family, the husband and wife make the decisions, but the husband is the head of the household. The family believes in what the bible says, “The Golden Rule”, “Treat others the way you want to be treated.” The developmental theory considers overtime the family unit foes through various phases that can be predicted based on norms. The family development approach examines role expectations within the family unit. I asked the family, “Are there any role assessments, such as “the good child” or “neat freak” the boys laughed and look at each other. Then the mom quickly responded, “No. Not at all. Our children know the law contained in the Bible and are governed by its principles.” They all seemed to be comfortable when answering the questions in the interview, although their answers were somewhat vague, the dad did not participate much in the interview. Instead, he was answering calls and working from home. The family was asked if they engage in any activities together. The family volunteers in Life Saving Preaching Work. They are all involved in this ministry that saves lives. In other words, they share the gospel with others, believing that they with come to know the Lord. The husband is also a volunteer in the medical field. He was not specific when answering this question. The Jordan’s also have what they call “round table discussions” which they partake in every Friday night. c) Boundaries

I wanted to know if their family had any subjects that were difficult to discuss together. The family brought up the subject of racism. Mrs. Jordan shared a story about other children in school making racial comments to her child. This was devastating to Mrs. Jordan and she found it very hard and complicated to discuss. She felt anger toward the children that bullied her son. We discussed other boundaries as well. For example, I asked if the...
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