Factors Responsible for New Imperialism

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DBQ 15: NEW IMPERIALISM: CAUSES
Historical Context
Between 1870 and 1920, the rate of European imperialism increased. This was due to economic, political, and social forces. The Industrial Revolution stirred the ambitions of European nations. The advances in technology allowed these nations to spread their control over the less-developed areas of the world. Historians have studied this empirebuilding frenzy. They have offered a variety of perspectives on its causes.

■ Directions: The following question is based on the accompanying documents in Part A. As you analyze the documents, take into account both the source of each document and the author’s point of view. Be sure to do each of the following steps: 1 . Carefully read the document-based question. Consider what you already know about this topic. How would you answer the question if you had no documents to examine? 2 . Read each document carefully, underlining key phrases and words that address the document-based question. You may also wish to use the margin to make brief notes. Answer the questions that follow each document before moving on to the next document. 3 . Based on your own knowledge and on the information found in the documents, formulate a thesis that directly answers the document-based question. 4 . Organize supportive and relevant information into a brief outline. 5 . Write a well-organized essay proving your thesis. You should present your essay logically. Include information both from the documents and from your own knowledge beyond the documents.

Question: Which economic, political, and social forces were most responsible for the new imperialism of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries?

PART

A

The following documents provide information about the causes of the new imperialism. Examine each document carefully. In the space provided, answer the question or questions that follow each document.

(continued) © 1999, 2007 Walch Publishing 121 Document-Based Assessment for Global History

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DBQ 15: NEW IMPERIALISM: CAUSES
Document 1
In this excerpt, author Parker T. Moon pointed out which groups were most interested in imperialism. The makers of cotton and iron goods have been very much interested in imperialism. This group of import interests has been greatly strengthened by the demand of giant industries for colonial raw materials. . . . Shipowners demand coaling stations for their vessels and naval bases for protection. To these interests may be added the makers of armaments and of uniforms. The producers of telegraph and railway material and other supplies used by the government in its colony may also be included. . . . Finally, the most powerful business groups are the bankers. Banks make loans to colonies and backward countries for building railways and steamship lines. . . . Source: Parker T. Moon, Imperialism and World Politics, Macmillan, 1936 (adapted) Which groups were seeking colonies, according to this author? Explain each group’s reason. ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________

Document 2
This excerpt was written by American Senator A.J. Beveridge in 1898. American factories are making more than the American people can use; American soil is producing more than they can consume. Fate has written our policy for us; the trade of the world must and shall be ours. . . . We will establish trading posts throughout the world as distributing points for American products. We will cover the ocean with our merchant marines. We will build a navy to the measure of...
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