Explore Some of the Ways in Which Owen Presents the Natural World in His Poems. Refer to Two Poems from the Collection You Have Studied

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Explore some of the ways in which Owen presents the natural world in his poems. Refer to two poems from the collection you have studied Wilfred Owen uses nature to convey his feelings about the war in his poems, using different techniques. In both of his poems that I am examining, ‘Futility’ and ‘Spring Offensive’ he uses nature to show the pain and suffering of man and war. In ‘Spring Offensive’ Owen mixes the idea of war and nature in a conversational tone unlike ‘Futility’ in which Owen questions the pointlessness of war and religion. Both poems are conveying the contrast of the same theme nature vs. The creation of man which can destroy it. Owen, having been a soldier himself therefore able to speak from first hand and create a very real and dramatic description of how the war and man destroy the beauty of nature and even question the purpose and meaning of life. His references to beauty of nature and the recurring theme of the sun clearly shows how Owen is somewhat in awe of nature. It is clear that Owen loves nature by describing it positively and in a way that shows how wonderful it is. An example of how Owen expresses nature into his poems is ‘Futility’, this poem already by the title meaning uselessness already gives us an indication of what the poet is trying to say about the soldiers. Exactly so as Owen in the first line says, ‘Moves him into the sun’ already describing the effect of the dead soldier being shifted into the sun. But why the sun? Owen could have said the shed or the hole but instead he used the sun which already starting with the nature. He almost made the theme of nature the character in the poem. You can see that nature makes him question everything. The narrator then goes on to use personification of the sun like a kind father figure, grandfatherly figure almost. The simple but powerful rhyme of ‘snow and know’ quite a moving rhyme brings home to us the death of the soldier. Owen then continues with the second stanza however takes a...
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