Explain How the Current Carbon and Climate Change Debate Can Be Interpreted as a Wicked Problem

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In an ever so increasing economic world, the rate in which modern society consumes emitting carbon in the atmosphere has become a pivotal issue in today’s world. Addressing the complex notion of climate change has significant implications in that it will revolutionise the workforce and consequently affect the various stakeholders. From generating an income to instigating a sustainable environment, the multi-faceted carbon debate has escalated into a wicked problem that has divided society. Climate change is one of the greatest social, political, economic and ecological issues that society faces today. Its complex and ill-defined nature between many stakeholders, who have many conflicting ideas, is what makes the climate debate a wicked problem. (Ritel) Since the industrial revolution carbon concentrations have increased by 35 precent in the world’s atmosphere and the Australian temperatures have risen one degree Celsius on average due to human activities. (Australian Bureau of Meteorology). Nevertheless many believe that climate change is a “natural phenomenon” and not caused by human intervention. The introduction of the Australian Carbon Tax in June 2012 has caused many speculations and tensions among the population. Economic rationalists believe that a regulatory tax on carbon emissions of $23 a tonne will be detrimental to the economy and industry especially in the current global climate. (do this ). However research by McKinsey states that “top companies regard climate change as an opportunity to get closer to suppliers, effectively reducing both costs and carbon in their supply chains”. (….) However every wicked problem has a symptom of another problem making it have no stopping rule. (Ritel) The increase in media tension over the years and social complexity of the wicked problem has only fuelled a greater disagreement among stakeholders making it tough to manage. John Camillus in the article Strategy as a wicked problem stated, “Wicked problems...
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