Ethics on Job, the Mechanic's Dilemma on Quotta

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Seeing the dilemmas

* Should the manager look after the benefits of the owner or should he do what he thinks is right?

* The amount of quotas being asked by the owner is it really a necessity or is he asking for too much?

* Should the manager support the owner’s decision being profit driven?

* Should the manager consider what the mechanics are mentoring him or they are also being greedy too?

* Should the manager look after the interest of his customers or the mechanics?

* Is it right to influence customers decision and impose them on doing maintenance works immediately even if it’s not urgent?

* Should the manager look after his wages and worry about his two daughters and the mortgage? Is this selfishness?

* The mechanics, should they stay quiet and deal with the job as it comes normally or find another job?

* Do the mechanics have to pressurize the manager to get more hours?

* As the owner, is it fair to give your employees a monthly quota?

* Is the quota a reasonable one?

* Shouldn’t the quota be changed according to seasons?

* Should the owner think more about his employees and give them some achievable incentives or should he worry about the company’s revenues?

* Is it a good idea to expand the business by doing a side job, for example,
‘Tyre repairs and wheel balancing’ or expand the business with another side job like a snack and coffee service? Instead of monthly quotas.

* Will a side business (expanding the actual one) make more revenues, while putting less pressure on the manager? Will there be a need to convince customers for preventative maintenance thereafter?

Talking the dilemma – Utilitarian
Costs involved here:
- Possible cancellation of the franchise
- Reputation of the company at risk
- Loss of business
- Loss of legitimacy
- Breach of the general policy of the corporation.
- If customers find out that the company was profit driven, doing unnecessary maintenances, there will be many unhappy people, negative feedback, lose customers.

Costs to employees (including the manager)
- More workloads
- If company collapses, many job lost.
- More pressure on manager.
- More difficulties to cope with work and social life.
- Unhappy because of being dishonest.

Costs to clients:
- Cheap job quality (due to pressure)
- Deceptive advice from the company = unnecessary expense.
- Poorer repair jobs that do not last long enough, because employees focussing too much on quota.

Benefits involved:
- Extra profit for the company.
- More revenues for employees.
- Continually achieving quotas means business is good, job is safe, bright future. - Children are happy at home, parents are happy too.
- Company gains popularity by doing high volume of activities (repairs / maintenance) - Company gets ahead of competitors.

Talking the dilemma- Deontology

- The right thing might be to focus on customer’s benefits. - To make the correct moral duties we have to understand our moral duties, which in every business must be customer satisfaction, not profit driven, not too being greedy.

- So we have to agree that the quota policy is not part of the general policy of the corporation and must not be compulsory.

- Convincing customers to make preventive maintenance is okay but make unnecessary maintenance is not. (Very unfair)

Talking the dilemma – Libertarianism

- Employees should be free to work without pressure.
- Workers should not be forced to do extra hours.
- There should be a freedom of choice.
- Those willing for extra hours/extra work to get more income should be doing so only based upon their willingness. - It is a good idea to make the quota system optional for those who want more hours only.

Talking the dilemmas – Virtue Ethics
Values promoting when “achieving the monthly quota’’
- I(the manager) am being rewarded 20% of my salary.
- Testing my skill and ability to perform well....
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