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Ethics Aids Patients

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1. Can he refuse to assist in this procedure?

The dental assistant cannot refuse to assist in this procedure. Besides it being unethical to refuse helping this patient solely because he has AIDS it is also illegal (Anderson, 2009). Dental assistants are bound by a code of professional conduct, adopted in August 2007 by the Dental Assistants National Board. Justice and fairness is one of the codes of conduct. This states the dental assistant has a duty to treat people fairly, behaving in a manner free from bias or discrimination on any basis. All DANB individuals must abide by the code of professional conduct and must maintain high standards of ethics and excellence. Violating this code may result in disciplinary actions and imposition of sanctions as listed below. (DANB CC, 2007) a. deny or revoke the Respondent’s eligibility, certification, or recertification b. suspend Respondent’s certification for a period of time; c. require the Respondent to engage in remedial education and/or training, or to perform community service; d. require the Respondent, if Certified, to participate in a mandatory audit of continuing education for a period of time; e. recommend that DANB take legal action against the Respondent; f. assess a disciplinary fine; or

g. take a combination of any of the above actions or such other action that may be deemed appropriate in the particular circumstances. (DANB DP, 2007) The dental assistant has a moral obligation to the patient and his colleagues to treat this patient as he would any other patient. The golden rule is always a good motto. Do unto to others as you would have them do unto you. His professionalism will be questioned as well. If he refuses to assist in the procedure, he puts the dentist and the dental practice in a position where they also could be sued for discrimination under the ADA Act of 1990 and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

2. What role would risk-management play in this case?...