Ethical Decions Affecting Tat's Auto

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1. How would ethical fading play a role in Tat’s decision to produce and market such a car? How would ethical fading play a role in the consumer’s decision to purchase such a car?

Ethical Fading – process by which the moral colors of an ethical decision fade into bleached hues that are void of moral implications Potential reasons include:
1. Processes that re-label the behavior in terms that are devoid of ethical consideration 2. Incremental steps which hide ethical implications of our decisions 3. Biases in perceived causation that erroneously reduce moral responsibility 4. Constraints that are induced by our mental representations of our self Tat’s viewpoint

* Advertising “Welcome to civilization” and “Your American relatives are not the only ones who can enjoy the good life” * The focus is on the billions of individuals and feeding their desires to be “with the times” rather than considering the consequences these vehicles will have on our environmental systems * Tat’s decision to produce is looking at their ability to aid the growing middle classes of India and discounting (consciously or unconsciously) or omitting the emissions consequences Consumer’s viewpoint

* Safer than transporting their family on a Moped
* All the other developing countries are abundant in automobiles

2. Using corporate doublespeak as your strategy, make a general case (role-playing Tata executives) that the development and marketing of this car is ethical. Then, make a doublespeak case by considering stakeholders and using utilitarianism or justice as your double speak approach.

Doublespeak – the language that makes the bad seem good, something negative appear positive, something unpleasant appear attractive or at least tolerable. It is language that avoids responsibility, language that appears to communicate but doesn’t, or language that conceals or prevents thought.

Tat’s executives:
Pro – We are providing these citizens the right and opportunity to transport themselves and their families in safe and more accommodating ways. Providing them a new, affordable means of travel will help expand the middle class citizens and increase their ability to conduct business. Con – On the other hand, do they have the infrastructure to support the addition of millions/billions of vehicles?

Stakeholders:
Pros – By selling these cheap cars we are now affording billions of people their right to commute like the rest of us. They are equally entitled to cars because it is a basic right. We are now including 1/6th the world’s population in the automotive business. Cons – On the other hand, the addition of millions/billions of new vehicles will worsen our CO2 emissions and further accelerate global warming. Introducing these vehicles will decrease the quality of life of not only our generation but more importantly, future generations. 3. Apply Nash’s questions to Tat’s decision to market this car, again by role-playing Tata executives.

1. Have you defined the problem accurately?
a. Yes – we are providing affordable vehicles to 1/6th the world’s population b. Maybe not – Perhaps there are two problems, transportation but also environmental issues. Maybe we should work on a cheap car that utilizes alternate energy sources. 2. How would you define the problem if you stood on the other side of the fence? c. The segment of people we are targeting for our product will be very satisfied knowing they can afford a car. d. There may also be concerns of pollution, extreme traffic issues including accidents, storage of cars and theft. 3. How did this situation occur in the first place?

e. India’s middle class is estimated to expand from 50 million to 500+ million by 2025 representing a large emerging segment of people. f. In China, only 3% of people own their own vehicles with cost being a main reason g. Possibly as many as 600 million cars on Indian roads...
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