England and Burgandy

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Johannes Ockeghem, Antoine Busnois, Medieval music
  • Pages : 3 (566 words )
  • Download(s) : 146
  • Published : April 21, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
England and Burgundy
* Renaissance: (French, “rebirth”) PERIOD of art, cultural, and music history between the Middle Ages and the BAROQUE PERIOD, marked by HUMANISM, a revival of ancient culture and ideas, and a new focus on the individual, the world, and the senses. * Burgundy:

* Martin le Franc:
* Contenance angloise: (French, "English guise") Characteristic quality of early-fifteenth-century English music, marked by pervasive CONSONANCE with frequent use of HARMONIC thirds and sixths, often in parallel motion. * John Dunstable:

* Guillaume Dufay:
* Gilles Binchois:
* Chapel: A group of salaried musicians and clerics employed by a ruler, nobleman, church official, or other patron, who officiate at and furnish music for religious services. * Cantilena (motet) : (Latin, "song") POLYPHONIC song not based on a CANTUS FIRMUS; used especially for polyphonic songs by English composers of the late thirteenth through early fifteenth centuries. * Paraphrase: Technique in which a CHANT or other MELODY is reworked, often by altering rhythms and adding NOTES, and placed in a POLYPHONIC setting. * Hemiola: (from Greek hemiolios, "one and a half") A metrical effect in which three duple units substitute for two triple ones, such as three successive quarter NOTES within a MEASURE of 6/8, or three two-beat groupings in two measures of triple METER. Hemiola may occur between voices or successive measures. * Fauxbourdon: (pronounced FOH-boor-donh) Continental style of POLYPHONY in the early RENAISSANCE, in which two voices are written, moving mostly in parallel sixths and ending each PHRASE on an octave, while a third unwritten voice is sung in parallel perfect fourths below the upper voice. * Hymn: Song to or in honor of a god. In the Christian tradition, song of praise sung to God. * (Verbal) Canon: (Latin, "rule") (1) Rule for performing music, particularly for deriving more than one voice from a single line of notated music,...
tracking img