Endangered Species and the Impact on Life

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 67
  • Published : February 13, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Jennifer Humphrey
Analysis Essay/Week 3
ENC1101-12
Endangered Species and the Impacts on Life

The Endangered Species Act of 1973 was approved Dec. 28, 1973. This act repealed the Endangered Species Conservation Act of Dec. 5, 1969. The 1969 Act had amended the Endangered Species Preservation Act of Oct. 15, 1966. The 1973 Act implemented the Convention of International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, signed by the U.S. on March 3, 1973, and the Convention on Nature Protection and Wildlife Preservation in the western hemisphere signed by the U.S. on Oct. 12, 1940. (www.fws.gov/laws/lawsdigest/esact.html)

Endangered Species do not only mean animals; there are also several plants, insects, birds, mammals, crustaceans and jelly fish, fish, sea anemones and coral, snails, and amphibians. The endangered species that I have chosen to research are native to either my state, Virginia, or my brother’s state, Maine. These endangered creatures are not only in the U.S., but all over the world. First, here are the top 14 most endangered species in the world and a description of what is going on with them, according to www.allaboutwildlife.com/ten-most-endangered-animals, this list was chosen by first consulting the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, and then reviewing the organizations data on many of the most critically endangered animals. A list was made, primarily based on the size of species’ population and threats that it faces. Then, the organization divided that list into groups to include sea mammals, terrestrial mammals, amphibians, reptiles and birds. Then the first 10 were picked from what seemed the most appealing and the most in need of help. The latter four, came from a previous list they wanted to share as important species as well. IUNC’s website has thousands of endangered species to choose from, their website is www.iuncredlist.org. 1. Ivory-Billed Woodpecker: A North American bird so endangered it may actually already be extinct. 2. Amur Leopard: The world’s rarest cat; only 40 left in Russia’s Far East 3. Javan Rhinoceros: No more than 60 of these swamp-dwelling Asian rhinos exist 4. Northern Sportive Lemur: The scarcest of Madagascar’s fast-dwelling lemur species 5. Northern Right Whale: Hunted near extinction; 350 still swim in the Atlantic 6. Western Lowland Gorilla: Disease and illegal hunting are taking an alarming toll on this gentle giant primate 7. Leatherback Sea Turtle: The population of the world’s largest turtle is dropping at an alarming rate 8. Siberian (Amur) Tiger: The world’s biggest cat weighs as much as 660 lbs. 9. Chinese Giant Salamander: Humans are eating the world’s largest amphibian into extinction 10. The Little Dodo Bird: Samoa’s little dodo bird is an imminent danger of following the large dodo into extinction 11. Kakapo Parrot: These flightless birds from New Zealand are so rare that they all have names 12. Greater Bamboo Lemur: Fewer than 100 of these Critically Endangered animals remain 13. Mountain Gorilla: Their habitat is shrinking and fewer than 700 remain 14. Hawaiian Monk Seal: Scientists don’t know why this seal population keeps declining

According to the same website, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said that the Eastern cougar is now extinct. An article written on March 2, 2011 (which is when the USFWS said this), states that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service had concluded that the last Eastern Cougar, or Mountain Lion, had been killed during the twentieth century; and no longer exists. The conclusion of the USFWS survey of this issue s certain to be controversial; during recent decades, many people had reported sightings of cougars east of the Mississippi. Some environmental activists have also made claims that the wildlife agencies have ignored or possibly even concealed evidence of the eastern mountain lions existence. In 2007, USFWS biologist Mark McCollough of Maine, had an...
tracking img