Employee Engagement

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 84
  • Published : December 9, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
Employee Engagement A review of current thinking
Gemma Robertson-Smith and Carl Markwick

REPORT 469

Published by:  INSTITUTE FOR EMPLOYMENT STUDIES  Mantell Building  University of Sussex Campus  Brighton BN1 9RF  UK  Tel: +44 (0) 1273 686751  Fax: +44 (0) 1273 690430  www.employment‐studies.co.uk  Copyright © 2009 Institute for Employment Studies  No part of this publication may be reproduced or used in any form by any means  – graphic, electronic or mechanical including photocopying, recording, taping or  information storage or retrieval systems – without prior permission in writing  from the Institute for Employment Studies.  ISBN 978 1 85184 421 0 

Institute for Employment Studies
IES is an independent, apolitical, international centre of research and consultancy  in HR issues. It works closely with employers in all sectors, government  departments, agencies, professional bodies and associations. IES is a focus of  knowledge and practical experience in employment and training policy, the  operation of labour markets, and HR planning and development. IES is a not‐for‐ profit organisation. 

Contents

Summary  1 Introduction  1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 2 Why is engagement of importance and interest?  IES research to date  Purpose of review  Method 

v 1 1 3 4 4 5 6 16 17 20 21 23 24 28 29 39 40 43 44 47 48 49 52

What is Engagement?  2.1 Defining engagement 

3

Outcomes of Engagement  3.1 3.2 3.3 Organisational outcomes  Employee outcomes  The downside of engagement 

4

Variations in Employee Engagement  4.1 Are some people more likely to engage than others? 

5

Enabling Engagement in Practice  5.1 5.2 5.3 Drivers of engagement  Barriers to engagement  In summary 

6

Measuring Employee Engagement  6.1 6.2 Existing measures  Acting on feedback 

7

Areas of Overlap With Other Concepts  7.1 7.2 Similar concepts  General thoughts 

iii 

8

Conclusion  8.1 8.2 Developing a culture supportive of engagement  Future research into engagement 

53 53 55 56 65

Bibliography  Related Publications   

iv 

Summary

1. Engagement is consistently shown as something given by the employee which  can benefit the organisation through commitment and dedication, advocacy,  discretionary effort, using talents to the fullest and being supportive of the  organisation’s goals and values. Engaged employees feel a sense of attachment  towards their organisation, investing themselves not only in their role, but in  the organisation as a whole.  2. Engaged employees are more likely to stay with the organisation, perform 20  per cent better than their colleagues and act as advocates of the business.  Engagement can enhance bottom‐line profit and enable organisational agility  and improved efficiency in driving change initiatives. Engaged individuals  invest themselves fully in their work, with increased self‐efficacy and a positive  impact upon health and well‐being, which in turn evokes increased employee  support for the organisation.  3. Engagement levels can vary according to different biographical and personality  characteristics. Younger employees may be positive when they first join an  organisation, but can quickly become disengaged. Highly extravert and  adaptable individuals find it easier to engage. Engagement is a choice,  dependent upon what the employee considers is worth investing themselves in.  4. Engagement levels vary according to seniority, occupation and length of service  in an organisation but not by sector. The more senior an individual’s role, the  greater the chance of being engaged. Presidents, managers, operational and  hands‐on staff tend to be the most engaged, professionals and support staff the  least, but this varies between organisations.  5. There are seven commonly referenced drivers of engagement: the nature of the  work undertaken, work that has transparent meaning and purpose,  development opportunities, receiving timely recognition and rewards, building ...
tracking img