Effects of Verbal and Visual Stimuli on Memory

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Abstract
The present articles focus is on the effect of verbal and visual stimuli on memory. Verbal and visual stimuli have profound influence on our cognitive processes and perception. Twenty participants were split into 2 groups, 10 picture accompanied and 10 non-picture accompanied. The non-picture group were read a list of 10 words (5 concrete and 5 abstract) and then asked to free recall. The picture group were also read a list of 10 picture accompanied words (5 concrete and 5 abstract) and asked to free recall. The hypothesis was not supported, as results were insignificant for remembering a picture word verus a non-picture word. There was also no change in results when the word was either concrete or abstract. Effects of Verbal and Visual Stimuli on Memory

Language is a universal phenomenon. We all are born with the ability to speak and understand language. We are able to understand visual representations of words and meanings, i.e. crosswalk lights and restrooms signs. Studies that we would interpret as being concerned with verbal referential meaning have appeared under such titles as linguistic determinism, stimulus predifferentiation, and acquired distinctiveness of cues. The term linguistic determinism can be understood by Whorf's (1956) hypothesis that language determines thought in the sense that it codes and categorizes the environment for the individual. Meaning that language has an influence on cognitive processes and perception

An overwhelming majority of experiments have involved the presentation of stimuli to the eyes, ears, or both. Brown, Cowan, & Saults (2004) studied the manner in which stimuli are processed and remembered often depends heavily on the sensory modality of stimulation. The immediate recall of word lists is usually superior for spoken, as opposed to printed, presentations. Modality effects have often been examined within the context of immediate serial recall (Brown, Cowan, & Saults, 2004). Despite over 50...
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