Education in 1890

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Education in the 1890’s Versus Education Today
By the 1890’s America was becoming an established society. Agriculture was a very important piece to society. It was the basis of the economy and many people relied on it for their livelihood. Education was becoming more efficient as time went by. But how is it compared to education of today?

In 1890, many politicians and educators wanted to make it easier for people to gain an education. At first, they just wanted to make schools as a way to reduce racism. But they then realized that whites should be getting an education too, not just the blacks. In order to do this, they needed more land to build schools and more teachers. This is where the First Morrill Act came into play. This act was to give every state that had remained in the Union a grant of 30,000 acres of public land for every member of its congressional delegation based on the 1860 census. These states were to sell this land and use the proceeds to establish colleges that would educate people in agriculture, home economics, mechanical arts and other professions. This first act still did not provide enough funds to adequately establish new colleges and it created more segregation of the blacks, so the Second Morrill Act of 1890 was established. This act states that states that maintained separate colleges for different races had to propose a just and equitable division of the funds to be received under the act. Any state that had used their 1862 funds entirely for the education of white students was forced to either open their facilities to black students or to provide separate facilities for them. This act forced the states to open their school to blacks, or they were not going to get anymore funds for the school.

As schools were opening and becoming more available to children, a law was passed saying that all children between the ages of 5 and 10 were required to attend school at the local school daily. Families had to pay for their children to go...
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