Dulce Et Decorum Est

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 204
  • Published : April 9, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
* A Detailed Study of “Dulce Et Decorum Est” by Wilfred Owen *
*
* In the poem “Dulce et Decorum Est” by Wilfred Owen, we see how the author presents powerful messages using irony with the translated title meaning sweet and fitting to describe the horrors of war. This, poem in particular, highlights the horrors of such a situation through the life of a soldier. In the poem, we are presented with the setting of a battlefield where the author uses metaphors and similes to describe the trepidations of war. It is this utilization of metaphors and similes - and its link to the theme of the poem – that makes this poem significant, and helps the reader to imagine what is being described. * Written in four stanzas, the poet conveys his feelings about the haggard soldiers, who experiences a gas attack and then has to watch as one of their friends dies in front of them. This poem is written using first-person narrative. The entire poem is composed of a soldier’s journey away from a battlefield and the appalling events they see on the way. One of the main events descriptions is of how the soldier and friend died on the battlefield. By using first person, Owen keeps the poem limited to only the speaker’s views. He describes how, “In all my dreams, before my helpless sight he plunges at me”, conveying how nightmares are haunted by what he has seen. * The setting of this poem is on the battlefield during the First World War. In the first stanza the poet set the scene, the battlefield, “we cursed through sludge.” Which tells the reader how the soldiers are living and working in these terrible conditions, fighting to stay awake and alive. This is significant as; it shows the reader how these soldiers are trying there very best to carry on, even in the worst of conditions. This also gives the reader a good mental picture for the setting, which could also just be the author’s state of mind, in which he pictures this scene many times before. * The mood...
tracking img