Dreams from a Different Sociological Perspective

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In the book written by F. Scott Fitzgerald “The Great Gatsby,” the narrator describes essential traits of life such as romantic love, friendship, money, the significance of trustworthiness, and the importance of social classes illustrated through Nick Carraway’s views and experiences. The narrator of The Great Gatsby who is also the author is Nick Carraway. It could be sensed that Fitzgerald's goal is to show something sophisticated and to describe The American Dream which arose during the Nineteenth century; a dream that was embodied in the ideal of the self-made man and is able to use the simplicity, of Nick Carraway's first person viewpoint. By narrating the book in first person viewpoint, the narrator grants the reader the opportunity to see the story in a constructed way where both the reader and the narrator are linked from beginning to end. Nick Carraway begins the story with a simplicity emphasized on his father’s advises. He begins by commenting on himself, stating that his father taught him to not judge other people because if he does not see it from their sociological perspective he will not understand his judgments. This gives us a clear example of his personality and way to approach things along his way which helps to describe himself as a both highly moral and tolerant person; Therefore he makes the plot a simple one by showing the reader that he is a moral young man raised in the Midwest who feels mentally limited according to his lifestyle in his town. Due to his limitation he seeks freedom in East Coast where he meets a strange neighbor by the name Gatsby who at first he feared but to whom he ends up admiring and who he mentions as of the hero of his story by stating that Mr. Gatsby represented a man with great knowledge and great happiness and for that, he is the only exemption to his judgments due to his mysterious personality. The Great Gatsby serves as Fitzgerald's critique of the American dream because the characters are Midwesterners...
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